tutorial

How to Plan a Year of Memory Work Your Kids Will Love

You found lots of resources, now it's time to plan memory work, and not just learn about it. You've got to do what's best for your family. Let's work on that together.

Take all the materials from the past 4 days and put them together to plan memory work that will be effective and your kids will love and look forward to doing! Easy plan, step by step, walks you through to customize for your homeschool.

Start to plan memory work

There are some things you going to need to know before you get started.

What you're going to do. When and how you'll do it. Plus, you'll also want to know what you're going to work on at any one time.

Will you do one category for a month straight, a semester? Will you work on a different type of item each day? Will you work on 4 different items for one week straight?

Where will you store your memory work materials? How will you use them?

Since we've got lots of questions to answer, let's get started right now!

Gather Materials

I've given you 4 days of materials to use quickly and easily. All you need to do is copy each item and paste it into a word document for quick access.

Have them all in one place, separated by category.

If you're using videos for some of your memory work, be sure to write the title and url on the document for quick reference.

This may take you some time up front, but you'll be glad you did it when it comes time to use it.

 

You can do a whole year's worth all at once, or just do terms, semesters, or months at a time. Do what is going to work best for you.

Do you like to be flexible? Then do a month or two at a time.

Do you like a plan, but not too rigid? Then do it by term or semester.

Do you want to do it once and not have to think about it again? Plan the entire year in one go.

Scheduling

Okay, here's where it might get tricky.

Do you have all your materials together? Are they broken up into categories? Good.

Look through them. How often do you want to cover each category?

Here's the categories from the 4 posts in this series: Scripture, hymns, doctrines, poems, quotes, history, science, math, language arts, and extra materials.

Now, let's decide how you'll go through each category.

Wait, did you pick the categories you want to do? I'm doing all of them, personally.

Do you want to work on one category for a specific amount of time? Work on a few each day? Work on one each day, but of varied categories?

Here's what I mean.

Monthly:

  • Sept - Poems
  • Oct - Quotes
  • Nov - Scriptures
  • Dec - History
  • Jan - Language Arts
  • Feb - Poems
  • March - Quotes
  • April - Hymns
  • May - Math
  • June - Science
  • July - Doctrine
  • Aug - Extra

Multiple a day:

Each day work on:

  • Religious (either scripture, hymn, or doctrine)
  • a poem
  • a quote
  • one educational (LA, math, science, history, etc) item

Go through each until they're memorized before adding a new item from each category.

One a day:

  • Mon - religious
  • Tues - poem
  • Wed - quote
  • Thurs - educational
  • Fri - religious
  • continue the pattern

When & how long?

For my family, the ideal time to do memory work is during our Morning Time. We do a lot of our group work together in the morning to set the tone for our day, including memorization.

You can do this during a group work block, during lunch, after lunch, after dinner, or at the end of your school day.

If your schedule is hodge-podged throughout the day, then pick the time that will work WITH your schedule and not when you think you should be doing memory work.

The length of time devoted to memory work is up to you and your schedule. We do at least 5 minutes, or if we're doing multiple items, we devote 5 minutes to each category and then stop when the timer goes off.

We're switching to 5 minutes with new material and 5 minutes of reviewing older material.

 

If you want longer, do longer. You can start out doing the time you want. Give it a week for everyone to get used to it and then adjust where you see the need. Longer? Shorter?

You'd be surprised. My children love memory work and beg to work on it for longer periods of time, especially songs. I was shocked outside my mind when we started it.

 Setting it all up

There's a few different ways you can do this. We'll explore your two options (and you may come up with a different one altogether) before you get started organizing it all.

Index Cards

We started off with index cards.

You get an index card box, dividers, and index cards. We used different colors for different categories.

You can put your items on your index cards like so:

  • Hand write each passage to be memorized
  • Type it out and print it onto the index cards (can be tricky)
  • Type it out, print it on paper, cut and glue onto index cards

You'll label the dividers as DAILY, SUN-SAT (or MON-FRI), EVEN & ODD, 1-31.

Memory Binder

You can also skip the index cards and use a memory work binder.

Print out each passage on its own piece of paper.

You'll need a binder, dividers, page protectors (optional), and paper with each printed passage.

Label the dividers: DAILY, MON-FRI (or SUN-SAT), EVEN & ODD, 1-31

OR you can label them like this:

DAILY, POEMS, QUOTES, SCRIPTURES, DOCTRINE, etc of the categories you'll use. You can put the EXTRA as one category, or break it down into math, science, history, etc.

Learn & review

Now, for the DOING part of it all.

If you use the index cards or the binder here is how you learn and review.

Pull out the passage.

Read it aloud, or have a child read it aloud.

Break it up into sections and start with the first. Add the next section. Go until you think that's enough for the day or your time runs out.

We generally set aside 5 minutes to learn a new passage and then 5 minutes to review the old passages.

Now. Add this new passage to the DAILY section.

Pull out the other passages under the DAILY section. Review them for 7 days, or until they're memorized fully (even if it takes longer or shorter).

Once you've reviewed it for 7 days move it to the EVEN or ODD tab (depending on what day it is). If it's January 15th, put it under ODD. If it's the 16th, move it behind EVEN.

Now, on even days, be sure to review those behind the DAILY and EVEN tab and visa versa for odd days.

Once you're done with that for another 7 days of review (7 times with even or 7 days with odd) move it to the day of the week that it is.

Now, you'll review: DAILY, EVEN/ODD, and whatever day of the week it is. You do this for a month.

Then you move the passage behind the number day it is. If it's February 23, put it behind 23. If it's the 2nd, move it behind the 2.

Now you'll review: DAILY, EVEN/ODD, day of the week, and Day #.

You leave the passage behind the number for 12 months (you'll review it 12 times). Then move it out into another box for all the passages you've finished. You can leave them there forever, or review them as you wish to.

 

If you put it in the binder or index cards with the label DAILY and then categories here's how you do it:

Review under DAILY tab for 7 days (or until it's completely memorized). Then move it behind the category it belongs to.

Each day review one passage from each category. Mark with a bookmark, post it note, or some other method where you left off.

 

You could also do a varied version of this:

DAILY, EVEN/ODD, and then categories.

This way you'd get a bit more review with each passage before moving it to the category section.

Okay, this is all sounding super complicated, and I apologize. If you're ready to shake me until I take it all back, I don't blame you.

 

Here's a quick synopsis to hopefully explain it much better and more simply.

Pick a storage system:

A: index cards

B: memory binder (we're switching to the binder)

 

Pick a schedule system:

A. one focus at a time

B. one category a day

C. each category a day

 

Pick a "learn & review" method

A. Daily, even/odd, weekly, monthly

B. Daily, 1 from each category (daily)

C. Daily, even/odd, 1 from each category (daily)

Add it all up and you've got your final plan.

Take all the materials from the past 4 days and put them together to plan memory work that will be effective and your kids will love and look forward to doing! Easy plan, step by step, walks you through to customize for your homeschool.

Other review methods

We're pretty simple and boring and just do verbal recitation and singing. Nothing fancy. Because of this I'm going to look to some other creative geniuses and send you to them to get even better ideas.

I am planning on adding the popsicle stick review method for sure.

  1. You write actions and funny voices on each popsicle stick.
  2. A kid draws a popsicle stick before each passage to be recited.
  3. You will all do the voice or action on the stick.

So fun! Volcano voice, mouse voice, march in place, etc. I love it. It would be super fun to come up with new ideas every once in a while to add to the collection.

Solagratiamom has a great list of ideas that she's used.

I think my favorite is #12- Emotional Wreck. You have them recite their memory work while they act out an emotion. For instance, sobbing, laughing, surprised, scared, worried, etc.

Another is they get to catch a super squishy toy and squeeze and pull on it while they recite. Great for those that love to be doing things with their hands while they work.

 

Half a Hundred Acre Wood has a ton of practice ideas.

Including, write it on the dry erase board and erase a word at a time, hand motions, hide and seek and more. She has ideas broken up by category-- even better!

Brandy has even more review games for teams, co-ops, or larger families. They look like so much fun !

 

That's it!

Okay, we've been through a lot together these past 5 days. I just want to end with one last thought.

Plan Memory Work time with things that will be of great value and use to your children. Don't memorize things just for the sake of memorization.

Memorize that which teaches, inspires, uplifts, encourages, and is beautiful. Really sit and think about what you want your children to gain and know and work backwards from there.

If there's something they're struggling with start there first.

Always always always make it work FOR you. Do what you need done in your home and not what someone else (including me) tells you to do.

 

I certainly enjoyed these past 5 days and know our own memory time has vastly improved because of it. I hope it blesses you similarly.

 

Parting gift

If you haven't already....

Grab the ASL Memory Work packet

[convertkit form=4901805]

and join the challenge!

50 IN 5 challenge

 

Catch up

Main: The Best Step-by-Step Guide to Memory Work

Day 1: Improve Your Child's Relationship to God with Memory Work

Day 2: 75 Quotes for Memory Work

Day 3: Phenomenal Poems to Rock Your Memory Work

Day 4: Brilliant Memory Work Hacks to Make Your Morning Time Transformative

 

Your Turn

Tell me your plans for memory work!!

Mwah

 

 

 

 

 

Click the picture to access the other 5-day posts!

5 Day Hopscotch iHN 2016

10 Insanely Easy Ocean Science Experiments

  Are you looking for some easy ocean science experiments? Don't want a ton of materials and spend tons of money and time gathering supplies for each experiment!  Get excited, because we could be besties.

 

Are you looking for some easy ocean science experiments? Don't want a ton of materials, money, and time gathering supplies for each experiment? Done and done.

Here are the 10 ocean science experiments we did, for reals with our unit study.

Honesty time-- I lurv science and I lurv science experiments. I don't love getting them all together and buying the most random materials that I will NEVER use again, or have to specialty order and shipping costs more than the freaking product. And I'll NEVER use it again!! And we're eating beans for a month because we've blown our school budget.

So I love simple, easy, cheap experiments that teach the concept, let the kids learn and explore and get excited about the topic.

 

You'll see all the experiments we did, along with instructions, explanations, and pictures (when I remembered to take a few shots).

Like seriously, I forgot to take pictures of the density experiment, so I will re-do it just for you when the kids are sleeping. The sacrifices I make for those I love (that's you, in case you were wondering).

Salt Water Density

The beginning of the unit study we started learning about and discussing the actual ocean.  How big it is, what it's made up of, and more. Salt water and its density seemed like a natural place to start.

Materials Needed

  • Egg
  • Two clear jars/vases/bowls
  • Water
  • Salt
  • Small toys
  • Whisk

1. Fill one jar with plain water.

2. Fill another with water and then add salt. We put in about 1/3c at first. I really wanted this to work, so I put in probably closer to 1/2c. I hate when science experiments don't go as promised. :-/  Stir like crazy.

Our water was lukewarm and Little Miss (8 y.o.) suggested we use hot water to help it mix better.

3. We had a selection of toys, little sea creatures, a medium sized rubber shark, a mega block, and a knight. We started with the knight. I asked them what they thought would happen when I put the knight in the plain water. Then I dropped him in. He sunk. The mega block floated. Then the remaining items all sunk.

Then we added the egg. It also sank.

4. Then I started with the egg in the salt water. They were so excited to see it floating! We added the remaining ingredients and they all sunk. Wah-wah-wah.

The kids suggested adding more salt, and that still didn't help.

This was when I attempted to discuss density. Things with higher density sink and things with lower density float. The salt makes the water more dense making it so that more items are less dense than the salt water, meaning more things can now float.

Why is this important? The kids thought it would help the fish swim and float better. Sweet Cheeks (4 y.o.) thought it would make it so they can float while they sleep. Cute!

Then we discussed why we thought the egg floated when the other objects didn't. The kids and I talked about perhaps it was because there was "liquidy stuff" inside the egg and there's liquidy stuff inside fish too and maybe that's why. Especially since the toys don't have food and blood inside them.

 

We veered off course a bit and I showed them how taking the Mega Block and a crumpled piece of paper I could put the block into the water and the paper would stay dry. They each had a turn trying it themselves.

We talked about how if you tilted it the water would go inside and the paper would get wet. When they pushed the block into the water I had them go slowly so they could feel the air pressure pushing against their hand.

In the video, Ocean, it briefly mentioned the old methods of exploring the ocean. At one point, explorers would be lowered down in a wooden box that had no bottom to it. This was how they were able to stay down there for a short time without the entire box being enclosed.

 

Captain (9 y.o.) pointed out water displacement and brainstormed why he thought this was happening.

 

I loved that despite the lackluster results of this experiment (only the egg floated when I wanted more to float), so I guess it wasn't a flop, really, we were able to get our brains working and thinking about all sorts of things related to what we were doing. To me, this is the essence of science. Curiosity, thinking, and exploring.

Layers of the Ocean

Materials

  • Mason jar
  • Water
  • Corn syrup
  • Rubbing alcohol
  • Dish soap (blue)
  • Vegetable oil
  • Food coloring (black, blue, green, purple)
  • Funnel
  • Spoon
  • 5 Small bowls
  • Measuring cup
  • Baster

1. Measure out 3/4c of each liquid. Pour into individual small bowls.

2. Add food coloring to each bowl and mix:

  • Black food coloring to the corn syrup.
  • Blue to the dish soap.
  • Blue & green to the water (keep it lighter than the dish soap).
  • Blue to the oil.
  • Light light blue to the rubbing alcohol.

 

3. Add the ingredients slowly and carefully in the following order:

Corn syrup [wc_fa icon="arrow-circle-o-right" margin_left="" margin_right=""][/wc_fa] dish soap [wc_fa icon="arrow-circle-o-right" margin_left="" margin_right=""][/wc_fa] water [wc_fa icon="arrow-circle-o-right" margin_left="" margin_right=""][/wc_fa]  oil [wc_fa icon="arrow-circle-o-right" margin_left="" margin_right=""][/wc_fa]  rubbing alcohol

4. Add labels to each layer. Done!

Sunlight Zone - rubbing alcohol

Twilight Zone - oil

Midnight Zone - water

Abyss Zone - soap

Trench Zone - corn syrup

Discuss the density of each liquid (relate it back to salt water density experiment). Ask: would salt water be on the same level in this jar as plain water?

 

Are you looking for some easy ocean science experiments? Don't want a ton of materials, money, and time gathering supplies for each experiment? Done and done.

 

I'm not going to lie, I got pretty ticked at this experiment. The dish soap got too dark. Grr. We put 2 drops of red! 2 drops! We were trying to make it purple. Instead, it turned red on top and black everywhere else. Tip: if you have blue dish soap, DON'T dye it at all.

Then the water. Oh the water. It just blended in with the soap. The vegetable oil was separated nicely, though it did bubble up. Then the rubbing alcohol kinda blended in, but made swirls as well.

I let it settle and am hoping to see some separation in the morning. But really, I'm just ticked I wasted 3/4c of dish soap.

Well, the kids did enjoy it, though admittedly, they were sad that it didn't look all awesome and separate. I followed the instructions from Steve Spangler science on how to do the liquid density experiment, but apparently I don't have the correct skill set.

 

I may do this paper and water jar version instead. Depends on our time and energy level.

 

We then read the book Down, Down, Down: A Journey to the Bottom of the Sea. It shows which marine animals live in which ocean zone with beautiful illustrations.

We used our plastic sea animals along with the book to determine which zone they are in and made a chart to match.

 

Shark Buoyancy

Materials

  • Toilet paper roll
  • Marker
  • 3 pennies
  • Balloon
  • Vegetable oil
  • Bowl
  • Water
  • Tape
  1. Draw a shark on the toilet paper roll (or cut out a shark on paper and tape it on).
  2. Tape 3 pennies, equally spaced, on the bottom of the toilet paper roll.
  3. Fill the bowl with water.
  4. Ask: what's going to happen to the shark? Drop the shark in the water and watch him sink. Discuss.
  5. Fill a balloon with vegetable oil, tie closed.
  6. Place the balloon inside the toilet paper roll, evenly.
  7. Observe: it's much heavier now! Ask: what's going to happen to the shark? Place the shark in the bowl of water and watch him float. Discuss!

Are you looking for some easy ocean science experiments? Don't want a ton of materials, money, and time gathering supplies for each experiment? Done and done.

 

Are you looking for some easy ocean science experiments? Don't want a ton of materials, money, and time gathering supplies for each experiment? Done and done.

Are you looking for some easy ocean science experiments? Don't want a ton of materials, money, and time gathering supplies for each experiment? Done and done.

 

The oil in the shark makes him buoyant.

Application and explanation:

ASK: What is holding us to the earth? (gravity). What is gravity?

There is gravity on land AND in the ocean. All the animals in the ocean are being pulled down, just like you are. Gravity holds us to the floor, and all our houses, cars, and toys, too. It also holds the ocean and the animals in the ocean down. But they aren't on the bottom of the ocean floor like you're standing on the floor!

What are they doing? They're floating.

How is this possible? Buoyancy!

ASK: What in the world is buoyancy?

Gravity pulls us down and buoyancy pushes us up! So the fish have made it so they can balance, or float. Many of them have a bladder, kind of like a ball, inside their bodies that is filled with gas. Think of a balloon when it's filled with air. The balloon is that bladder and the air in the balloon is the gas inside it.

Sharks don't have a bladder filled with gas. So what is helping them float? Their bodies do not have ANY bones, instead, they have cartilage. This cartilage is less dense. Remember, when we saw how less dense items floated easier in the water? Your ears and tip of your nose is made out of cartilage, too! Sharks also have a very large liver, and fins that help them steer and stay afloat.

Their bodies are still pretty heavy, of course, heavier and more dense than water. Their fins help them to move forward all the time. They never stop moving!

Their liver is much larger than ours. It's filled with oil, like what we just used in our experiment. It is similar to the bladder in the fish we just talked about. It gives the sharks neutral buoyancy. That means that it's not getting pushed up and it's not sinking down, but staying at the same level.

All of these things combine to help sharks stay afloat and not sink to the bottom of the ocean floor! Pretty cool, huh!?

The kids really loved this one. Their favorite part? Wiggling their ears with wonder as they realized that sharks were made of the cartilage.

How Whales Stay Warm

Materials

  • Crisco
  • 2 Ziplock baggies (sandwich or quart size)
  • Rubber band (big enough to fit around hand)
  • Bowl
  • Water
  • Ice
  1. Fill bowl with water and add lots of ice. You want it cold!
  2. Scoop a bunch of crisco into the first ziplock bag.
  3. Place the 2nd bag inside the first.
  4. Place your hand inside and secure both bags onto your hand with a rubber band.
  5. Squish the crisco around your fingers and hand. Use your free hand to do help. Don't worry, your hand will stay grease free!
  6. Place your free hand into the ice water. Yikes!
  7. Now, place your crisco hand into the water. It's not freezing!

The fat keeps the whales warm!

Are you looking for some easy ocean science experiments? Don't want a ton of materials, money, and time gathering supplies for each experiment? Done and done.

 

When I worked at a wilderness therapy program, we lived and hiked in snowy mountains. We'd hike and sleep in near-blizzards. We only had a tarp, sleeping pad, and sleeping bag to keep us warm (besides our clothes). No tents! We ate bacon at every meal. We added butter to our hot chocolate and anything we were making. We ate as much fat as we could every day to help keep us warm.

I still was freezing cold, so I'm not sure how much it helped, but I'm alive so it must have helped some!

They loved this experiment! They were shocked that their hand didn't get cold at all! It was a pretty cool feeling.

 

Maybe I'll slather myself in crisco when I head to the cold pools this summer? Get a wicked sunburn at the same time. Win-win, right?

You know I'm kidding, right?

Tide Pool

Materials

  • Roasting pan
  • Rocks
  • Sand (optional)
  • Plastic sea animals
  • Water (of course)
  • Clay/Play doh (optional)

Create a tide pool with your rocks. Look at pictures of real tide pools to see what they look like. Layer and build your rocks. Add sand, if you have it and want to.

You can also use play doh or clay to build up your tide pool.

Add in plastic animals in various locations of your tide pool. Try to add those that would actually be in your tide pool and leave out those that aren't.

Fill with water as the high tide comes in... and then empty as the low tide goes out. Then fill again and play!!

We watched a few videos on tide pools. [insert links]

 

Water/Shoreline Erosion

Materials

  • 9x13
  • Sand
  • Water
  • Water bottle
  1. Place sand on one side of the pan. Make it a steep slope
  2. Pour water into the other side, until it's halfway up your sand slope.
  3. Place your water bottle on the end with the water. Push the bottle down to create small waves. Do this, consistently and evenly for 1 whole minute. Write down what you observe.
  4. Push again with your water bottle for another minute. You may make your waves bigger, or keep them the same size. Make observations.

 

Ocean Bottle

Materials

  • Empty ketchup bottle (or other narrow-necked bottle with lid)
  • Corn syrup
  • Blue food coloring
  • Vegetable oil
  • Long spoon

Fill the bottle 1/4 of the way with corn syrup.

Add a few drops of blue food coloring and mix with spoon handle.

Slowly pour in vegetable oil until the bottle is halfway full.

Put cap on. Make sure it's real tight.

Turn the bottle on its side, tilt it slowly so the capped end is down at a slight angle. The corn syrup will crest in the bottle's neck.

Cornmeal Currents

Materials

  • Mixing bowl
  • Water
  • Cornmeal (a pinch)

Fill the mixing bowl with water, almost to the top.

Sprinkle the cornmeal into the bowl.

Blow steadily across the water surface (not into the bowl). Make sure it's not too gentle or too forceful (you can experiment with wind intensity later).

The cornmeal will be swirled around by the currents just as in the ocean. The northern hemisphere is clockwise and the souther, counter clockwise.

Deep-Water Currents

Materials

  • 9x13 pan
  • Water
  • Ice pack (or baggie of ice)
  • Food Coloring
  1. Fill the 9x13 with an inch of water. Make sure the water is room-temperature (or slightly warmer).
  2. Set the ice pack (or baggie) against the edge of one side of the pan (inside the water).
  3. Place 1 drop of food coloring right in front of the ice pack and 1 drop on the opposite side of the pan.
  4. Observe and discuss.

The drop near the ice pack will move forward  because the cold water is pushing the warm water away. The drop on the other side stays there because the cold water keeps it from moving.

 

Penguin Camo

Materials

  • Mason jar
  • Water
  • Craft foam, black & white
  • Glue stick
  • Scissors
  • Black paper
  1. Cut a 2" square out of the black and white craft foam.
  2. Glue them together and cut out a penguin shape.
  3. Fill the mason jar halfway with water and place the penguin, black side down on top of the water. Hold the jar under a light source (lamp, lightbulb, flashlight) and look at the penguin from the bottom of the jar. It should be easy to see.
  4. Now, turn the penguin over, white side down. Now look through the bottom of the jar again. This is the way penguins swim! It's much harder to see now because the light and the white blend together, making it harder for predators to see from underneath.
  5. This time, place the jar on top of the black paper. The black paper represents the darkness of the ocean. Take a look from above the jar to see how the black side of the penguin helps blend into the water from this angle!

 

That wraps up all our ocean science experiments! We had so many great conversations with each experiment and it's always a treasure to hear them talk about and relate other things to the new things they've learned.

As we've studied the ocean these have really added a great depth to their understanding and grasping of each concept. I highly recommend doing as many of these as you can.

If you're on the hunt for even more experiments (simple ones) with accompanying explanations I highly highly recommend the book Awesome Ocean Science! There are many experiments and activities for many aspects of the ocean. It covers all the topics, not just the water portion. I learned quite a bit just thumbing through the book! Seriously, go check it out. You'll thank me later. ;-)

 

Let me know which one your kiddos loved the most! Do you have any other fun ocean experiments for us to try?

Mwah

Ocean Unit Study Vocabulary, Writing, & Geography

  You're all set for the ocean unit study, but need to know the nitty gritty details. Here are the vocabulary, writing, and geography portions of this unit study. Learn an easy and fun way to do map work and vocabulary. Plus, writing prompts!

Here are the vocabulary, writing, and geography portions of the ocean unit study. Learn an easy and fun way to do map work and vocabulary. Plus, writing prompts!

Let's jump right to it.

Ocean Vocabulary

  • abyssal plain
  • algae
  • anemone
  • barnacle
  • basalt
  • buoyant
  • continental shelf
  • colony
  • continental crust
  • continental drift
  • continental slope
  • coral
  • coral reef
  • deep sea trench
  • dorsal fin
  • echolocation
  • estuary
  • faults
  • glacier
  • invertebrate
  • jelly fish
  • lagoon
  • mantle
  • mid-ocean ridge
  • migrate
  • ocean
  • oceanic crust
  • oceanography
  • octopus
  • pectoral fins
  • plankton
  • rift
  • school
  • sea
  • sea mountains (seamounts)
  • sea star
  • sediment
  • shark
  • shore
  • tide pool
  • waves
  • whale

Add words as you come upon them and you'd like to add them to your list. Also, remove words that you don't need or want to cover.

How to learn vocabulary

Our kids fill this Vocabulary Word Map  for each word. You can create a word search puzzle as well for a fun review and recognizing the new words. A fun addition to this puzzle would be to make the word clues the definitions of each vocabulary word.

For the ocean vocabulary, we didn't do the antonyms and synonyms in the word maps.

We're just covering a few terms a day, and some days more than others.

 

Writing assignments

Here's some prompts to get the brain juices flowing (gross).

  • Write a story about your new pet (you can see this in the Ocean Unit Study main post)
  • Write a letter to an organization that works with the ocean or sea life
  • Write a magazine article about an important issue with the ocean/sea life
  • Write a magazine article about your favorite marine animal
  • Write a research paper
  • Write a poem about the ocean
  • Write a story for a young sibling/child
  • Write an email to your grandparents about all you've learned
  • Write a newsletter to your family about all the things you've done and learned

Just so you know, we will NOT be doing all of these writing assignments. For now, we're doing the pet story, and the research paper. After that, I will let each child pick one more writing assignment. But really, that's only if we haven't petered out and decided we were done with the unit study.

Pick and choose, but make sure you do at least one writing assignment. Writing is such an important skill to learn and it's not too early to start.

If you think of a different writing assignment, go for it! These are just to get your brain thinking. I'm sure you can come up with even better ones. Please share them in the comments! For reals.

 

Geography/map work

Here are the oceans, seas, and major rivers we're learning

  • Atlantic
  • Pacific
  • Arctic
  • Indian
  • Southern
  • Caspian
  • Black
  • Red
  • Mediterranean
  • Arabian
  • Amazon
  • Nile
  • Congo
  • Yangtze
  • Hwang ho
  • Tigris
  • Euphrates
  • Indus
  • Volga
  • Danube
  • Rhine
  • Mississippi

How we study geography

Head over to our world map and identify the oceans. Then the seas. Then the rivers-- this is easier with a world atlas (which we are in great need of-- here we come Amazon).

We also look at these with our globe...  Or would have, if Teddy Bear (almost 2) hadn't decided to throw it down the stairs because he thought it was a ball. Now it's dead. But we do have an inflatable globe that works in a pinch.

Just keeping it real.

 

After that we use this technique that I learned from Jessica Hulcy a few years back.

Index card map work

1. Grab an index card for each continent and ocean.

2. Have the kids draw an outline of the continent on an index card. Then, write the name in the middle. Do this for all 7.

Here are the vocabulary, writing, and geography portions of the ocean unit study. Learn an easy and fun way to do map work and vocabulary. Plus, writing prompts!

3. Write the name of each ocean on an index card. You may need two for a few of the oceans (i.e. the Pacific).

4. Place the index cards on a table, or floor. Arrange them to show where they are in relation to one another.

 

Here are the vocabulary, writing, and geography portions of the ocean unit study. Learn an easy and fun way to do map work and vocabulary. Plus, writing prompts!

 

5. Pick them up and place them down again, talking through it. Scramble them up, do it a few more times.

6. Have your children take turns doing it on their own, prompting ONLY when they get stuck. Encourage them to place them as best they can before asking for help.

When they get it wrong I pull the index cards that are placed incorrectly and have them work through it. If a ton are wrong, I'll scramble them all up and go through it again with them.

7. Do this until you feel they've got a handle on it.

 

You will also do the same thing for the various seas. Add the seas in AFTER they have the oceans and continents mastered. You may want to cut each index card in half to show the size.

Here are the vocabulary, writing, and geography portions of the ocean unit study. Learn an easy and fun way to do map work and vocabulary. Plus, writing prompts!

 

Now, pick up all the index cards, arrange the continents, the oceans, and then the seas.

Follow the same procedure done for the oceans.

 

[embedyt] http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dqNXLnIVYBk[/embedyt]

[wc_box color="secondary" text_align="left"]

Here's Animal, 6 (on the left), Little Miss, 8 (middle), and Captain, 9 (on the right). As you can see Animal is super excited, Little Miss has watched her fair share of YouTube tutorial videos. I could barely keep the laughter in, so please forgive any shaking of the camera. :)

[/wc_box]

 

For the rivers you can draw them on the index cards where they are on each continent.

OR

Draw the river on blue construction paper, label it, and then place them on the continent index card. This way, you can also remember the shape and location. If you draw them on, it may not be remembered as well.

 

This is seriously the best way to remember the locations and relationships between locations.

We did this when we learned the 13 colonies and when we studied explorers. My kids learned it so fast. On top of that, I learned them and where they all are in relation to each other. I think that's my favorite part-- not just knowing what the state or country looks like, but where it is in relation to other locations.

Updates

We're going to re-do our index card mapping later this week, or next. We're going to put our continents on a bigger piece of paper and trace the continent from a printed map.

Why not just print them out? Well, it helps the kids learn the shape of the continent better and understand where things are in relation to each bump and point on the outline.

Then we'll cut out the seas into smaller pieces so they're easier to fit in where they belong. We haven't done the rivers yet, but now they'll fit even better on our bigger continent pieces.

When we get the new set done, I'll update this post.


More ocean unit study goodness to come

Now you're ready to go with your vocabulary, geography, and writing portions of the ocean unit study. Stay tuned for the next sections!

We've got ASL, art, science, math, and a final project still to go.

Mwah

 

 

 

How to Teach Your Child Reverence - The Best Method

Sometimes you wonder why you even bother going to church...all you're doing is wrestling your child trying to get them to shush for 1 minute bursts. You can teach your child to be reverent without bribes, rewards, or death threats! CLICK to read more on the best method (and the easiest) to teach your child reverence. Reverence... doesn't have to be hard to teach.

You ask yourself, "why am I even bothering to go to church?"

What's the point when you miss most everything and you're wrestling a stinker child the entire time? Let me be the first to remind you that despite your struggles it really is worth it. That's all well and good, but we don't want to have church time equate a battle of the wills.

I have many people that ask me how I get my kids to be so reverent in church.

 

Please don't misunderstand, I'm not bragging. Nor am I saying my kids are heavenly angels 100% or even 90% of the time. They're regular children, just like everyone else's. Meaning, they get into trouble every day.

I am also not saying I am the master of parenting. Ha!

I AM saying it's possible to teach your children reverence (or quiet, to start with) without bribing, rewards, or death threats.

 

Here are the reverence rules:

Sometimes you wonder why you even bother going to church...all you're doing is wrestling your child trying to get them to shush for 1 minute bursts. You can teach your child to be reverent without bribes, rewards, or death threats! CLICK to read more on the best method (and the easiest) to teach your child reverence.

  1. No toys
  2. No paper and coloring things*
  3. No food*
  4. No more than one warning
  5. Don't reward bad choices

Okay, here's how it goes down.

Don't bring toys to church. NONE.

That is all. Do not bring toys. They do not need them. Honest.

How will they learn to listen to the service (or their teachers) if they are always playing with toys? I do NOT want to get into a debate about ADD/ADHD and all that goodness. Both my brothers and myself have these and trust me when I say, we went without toys and we were still happy and able to listen.

Same for coloring supplies

Ditch the coloring goodies. Leave them at home.

*There is a point you can re-introduce these. We'll talk about those in a minute.

Food is unnecessary!

Don't have your bag filled with fruit snacks, crackers, cheese, bananas, etc, etc.

If your child is over the age of 3 they don't need snacks at church. So don't bring any. The only exception to this is if your child has a real medical reason to have food accessible. A real one.

*If they're under the age of 3, bring only the minimal amount and not a bajillion choices. One or two things max, and a drink.

For instance, Teddy Bear is 19 months old now. We bring a sippy cup and a small snack bag of cereal or goldfish. ONE snack bag. It's not even all the way full. I only bring it out when it's necessary.

Seating Arrangements

They can sit in your lap or sit next to you. Those are the ONLY two options!

If they've over a certain age/size, then sitting in your lap would not be a good idea. My 6, 8, or 9 year old in my lap? I don't think so.

  • You don't let them get down to walk around by your feet.
  • You don't let them sit down on the floor.
  • You don't let them walk around the aisles or crawl around the aisles.

I do allow my children to stand on the benches until they reach an age/height that makes that inappropriate. Usually around 2.

One warning ONLY!

This shouldn't be a wrestling match. If they are misbehaving in ANY way (crying, whining, talking loudly, wrestling trying to get down, etc) you give them stern, but quiet direction. No threats, no warnings, no counting, no chances.

Here are some examples of things to say/do:

  • Tap them on the shoulder.
  • Tap them on the shoulder + "the look"
  • Tap them on the shoulder + a silent Shhhhh
  • "No more crying."
  • "Stop whining"
  • "You can sit next to me or sit in my lap. Those are your choices. You have 10 seconds to pick or I'll pick for you."  **Count the 10 seconds in your head only.** 
  • "It's time to be quiet"
  • "Stop. Now."

Etc.

You only say it once!!

One time. Uno. Not two, not three, not one and a half. ONE. TIME.

Well, what happens when they do it again?

Pick them up as gently as the situation allows, and without fuss you remove them from the chapel. If they are too big to be carried, you hold their hand and lead them out. If they're too old for that, walk them out in any way you see appropriate but the least disruptive to those around you.

Even if you warned them 5 minutes ago, you remove them now. If it was significantly longer than 5 minutes, I'll leave it up to your discretion, just keep an eye on it. Don't let it become a pattern or habit. If it happens at regular intervals, drop the hammer after the first reminder no matter the time between the first offense and the second.

My recommendation: until their good behavior has been consistent I would remove them even if they didn't misbehave for 30 minutes. Then, when they have been consistent, I'd become more relaxed.

NOW... this is the important bit.

You've just removed your child from the chapel because of poor choices.

Do NOT set them down to walk/crawl around!

Do NOT talk with others in the hallway!

 

  1. Find a quiet corner or empty classroom. Preferably with a chair or table. Don't leave the church. Stay inside.
  2. Set them down on the chair (a table will do in a pinch).
  3. Say, "we will go back in when you are ready to stop ____."
  4. Do not say more.

Do not make eye contact. Do not engage with them at all. At all. If they get down, pick them up and set them back down. Do not say a word no matter how many times they get off the chair or how upsetting it can be.

Do not show them any type of emotion in your face, eyes, body, or voice. Just be calm and neutral. Take deep breaths and maybe find your own nearby spot to be quiet in.

Why are we doing this?

The reward for their good behavior is to go back into the chapel and sit down with their family.

If you let them run around or are talking to other people the reward for their behavior is to get out of the chapel and have fun. Not the message you want to send.

When they've stopped crying or whining for a sufficient amount of time then come back in. Look happy and calm. Sit back down and enjoy your church service.

My general rule of thumb: 1 minute per year they are old -- I'll do longer if I feel they're not quite done. It does need to be that whole amount of time.

For instance, Sweet Cheeks is 4. If she were to be set on the chair, I'd have her be quiet for at least 4 minutes. If she gets down at 3.5 minutes, or starts crying again at 3.5 minutes (or any other time), her time starts over when she stops crying or sits back down. No exceptions. It must be 4 minutes straight.

Repeat as many times as is necessary.

Here are some more things you may find helpful.

  • Sit up towards the front.
  • Don't sit next to their friends.
  • Don't sit next or near (in front of or behind) families with children that are rowdy and disruptive.

When my eldest was 4 we once made the mistake of sitting near a family with a boy his age. His parents literally had a backpack FULL of toys and a backpack FULL of food. No joke. TWO BACKPACKS full of stuff for their one child. My son saw that and went berserk. Of course he wanted those toys and food! I did too, and I'm an adult!

You can sit near other rowdy kids or friends when your kids have been able to sit through the whole service for a few months without having to be removed.

Now, this isn't because we're better than those children or parents. We're not. This is for your children to be able to develop their own discipline without having to work even harder than usual for it. Sitting still and quiet can be a real challenge for some. Let's make it as easy as possible on them.

  • When your kids are older and have been reverent for some time (more than a few months), then you may bring a FEW sheets of paper and a small set of writing utensils. One pencil, one pen, or a FEW crayons/colored pencils (not the whole box).

My children receive these items after the sacrament portion of the service is over. This could be your communion, or other really important part of the service. Or about 1/3 through.

I don't even allow these items to be used every Sunday.

If they slip into bad habits they are removed.

  • When the older children need a drink of water or to go to the bathroom they are to leave quietly go about their business and return promptly. If it's been some time I either send an older child, or my husband or I go to check on them. If they're caught playing, talking, or dawdling, they will now have to be taken to the bathroom/water fountain for the next month.

[Tweet "Teaching children to be reverent is easier than I thought!"]

That's it!!

I realize that some of you may find this approach strict and even mean. You're allowed to believe what you believe. I, however, disagree with your disagreement. ;)

I have used this approach with each of my children with great success and without a ton of work. My rowdiest child was calm after two Sundays of "work."  I haven't had to take him out ever again.

I also see the fruits of my labor in other areas. When we go to a doctor or dentist appointment, if we have any meeting where they are required to sit still and be quiet, they can do it and it's not a power struggle. When they're at their sports practice, dance class, they are usually the only kid paying attention to their coach or teacher. They pay attention in their homeschool co-op and aren't chattering away with their friends when they should be working or listening.

Most important to me, my children listen to the church service, they listen in their Sunday School classes and actively participate. That is how children go from learning to sit still and be quiet, to learning to show true reverence.

This is how they are given the opportunity to learn the gospel, grow closer to their Father in Heaven and the Savior. To learn truths that will bless their lives forever. That is the biggest win of all.

This is perfect for pinning!!

Sometimes you wonder why you even bother going to church...all you're doing is wrestling your child trying to get them to shush for 1 minute bursts. You can teach your child to be reverent without bribes, rewards, or death threats! CLICK to read more on the best method (and the easiest) to teach your child reverence.

Let me know how it goes!

Have any questions? Success stories? Please share them below!

Mwah

 

 

 

 

The Homeschool Omnibus is here! Grab the 90 Creative Resources to Refresh Your Homeschool

Turn Into a Cat (With Makeup)

cat potion

Meow.

 

Sorry about that, I couldn't resist.

 

I have two looks for you today.  One is more cat-like and the other is just a super simple look.  Bonus!  You get to see my oldest daughter today.

 

I know y'all have said, that looks too complicated or it'll take too long, but truly they really don't take much time at all.  It's about the same as it takes me to put on my regular makeup. Plus 5 more minutes.

 

You can't cheat and say all I put on is moisturizer and lip gloss.  That's not fair for two reasons.  #1 - that's time cheating and #2 - I can't get away with just that; I'll look sick.

 

The first time may take a bit longer, but you really can't mess up a cat face too much.  If you don't like it add something over it.

I actually wish I had used an orange-brown, but I forgot about my other palette that has red and yellow in it.  Red + yellow = orange.  Duh.  So ridiculous.  And not in a good way.

 

[Tweet "Let's meow it up. I've got my cat face on."]

 

First up.  My cat face.

 

cat materials

Materials

Cake makeup: white

Cream makeup: light, and medium (colors of your choosing)

Brushes

Eyeliners: brown, black, liquid

Red lipstick

Mascara

 

 

cat 1

 

White out your face.  Blend blend blend!  I did this in a couple of layers to ensure it was even as possible.  If you have a translucent powder, use that over it to really smooth it out.

 

cat 2

 

 

Cat eyes.  Make sure your pencil is sharp!

  • Line your upper lashes. At the corner make it thin.
  • Line the inner eye and along the water line on the lower lashes.
  •  Smudge it just a bit down onto the lower lid.
  • Extend the corners down into thin triangles.
  •  Flare the outer corners up.  You can be more dramatic with it if you'd like.

 

cat 3

 

 

This is harder to see.  I used my tan color to add in color patches.

  • The bottom one extends in a triangle shape beginning at the bottom of the cat eye out to my cheek bones.
  • The middle starts at the outer corner of my eye.
  • The top is at my eyebrows.

No need to get all precise.  You can do whatever shapes or areas you'd like.  Today I chose this.

 

cat 4

 

 

  • Add in a dark brown stripe at the eye area.
  • Add in dark brown shading to get a bit more of the face shape of the cat.  It's not exact, just pushes the face to look more cat-like. It should actually be more of an upside-down L. Boo.

 

cat 5

 

 

  • Draw on dark brown stripes over the tan areas.   It really made the tan areas stand out more and feel more cat like.
  • Smudge some brown around my hairline to further shape the face and give it some more cat markings.

 

cat 6

 

 

  • First, I added more brown stripes at the cheeks.
  • Second, I added a line on either side of my nose and extended it above my eyebrows.
  • Last, I followed that line and curved it into my eyelid.

 

cat 7

 

 

  • Add in some tan down the nose in between the two lines, blend it and make sure it fades into the white as it gets onto the forehead.
  • Take your black eyeliner and draw the shape for your nose first. Fill it in.  Get into the nostrils to ensure that you don't have white dots. That'd be weird.
  • Draw a line down to your lips.  Not too wide and not too thin.  If your lips are no longer white, go back over it with some more.  Let it dry.
  • Now, take your black eyeliner and draw the lip in.  I started at my peak, drew down into a long extended angle. As it neared the corner of my lips it was just a thin line.
  • Do both sides.

 

cat 8

 

 

This was a fun part.

  • Take your brown eyeliner and go over the dark brown stripes.
  • Make thinner stripes over, add in more detail at the hairline, forehead, and eyes.

 

cat 9

 

 

Added in more detail.

Cheek details and my favorite, a cat beard.

Do one side at a time and then try to match it up a bit by bit. Don't stress over it!  It'll turn out!

 

cat 10

 

  • I blocked out the end of my eyebrow a bit with paint.
  •  Took my eyebrow pencil and filled in my brow and extended the line up and out at an angle.
  • I wanted that line on my eyelid to be longer, so I made it longer.

 

cat 11

 

 

Let's finish up that lip!

  • Draw the bottom lip with brown eyeliner.
  • Fill it in with red.
  • Then add a bit of white to the center and blend it.  That makes it appear more plump and gives it dimension.
  • You could make this part skinnier to imitate a tongue instead of a lip.  You'll see that with the one I did for my daughter.

 

cat 12

 

 

  • Add in whisker dots.
  • If you had fake whiskers you could glue them on.  I do not.  Therefore, I did not.

 

cat final

 

All done!  Meow!

It'd be awesome if I had a cat suit and maybe something to put on my head to make myself look more like a cat.

If I had a costume on I'd make sure to have the makeup that goes down my neck extend all the way down into the collar of my shirt.

Don't stop at the edge, you have to allow for movement. Go into the shirt collar.

 

Second cat. My daughter.

cat child final

 

Isn't she so cute!?

  1. Start with a cute face.
  2. Cover it with the tan color.  Blend blend blend!
  3. Take dark brown and add in a patch around one eye.  It's hard to see here. Sorry.
  4. Add in the nose details and whisker dots.
  5. Put in the tongue.  You can't see it as well because she's smiling, but hers is narrower on the bottom portion.  The other picture that shows it better her eyes look creepy from blinking.

 

I've done this on her so she can have fun playing pretend.  This would be fun to do if your daughter (or son) has a friend over and they can be cats.  It takes 5 minutes to do this and makes my little girl feel so special.

 

I'll be doing some more fun things and show you how to do a simple fun version for the kiddos if you don't want to spend forever doing a longer version.  That doesn't mean you shouldn't do the longer version!

 

[Tweet "Turn yourself into a cat easily with makeup."]

Mwah

How to Give Yourself a Big Scab

Scabs can be fun...  to pick.  

I know you used to pick your scabs!  You probably still do.  But don't worry, I won't tattle.

 

Making scabs is super easy and you still don't have to get hurt.  There's hardly any work.

 

[Tweet "I am about to scab myself up. Join me!"]

 

Scab Time!

scab 1

 

These are the supplies you need.

  1. Liquid Latex  It's really easy to use and has multiple uses, but it stinks like fish.  Once it dries it stops smelling.  Here is a teeny tiny bottle I have that has a brush built into the lid.  I still use the Q-tip for some of the steps.
  2. Bruise and Cut Wheel
  3. Q-Tips
  4. Coffee I got mine at a hotel I was staying at since I don't drink the stuff. You only need a little bit, depending on the size and amount of scabs you want to create.  Think skinned knee or road rash.
  5. Tea bag  I don't like it much for scabs. It was too big.  It'd be good if you want to look like you have actual gravel embedded in your wound.

 

All you'll need after that is the place for your scab.  Here's my lovely knee.  Have you ever seen something so lovely?  Don't answer that.  Just be happy I shaved (two days ago).  That doesn't happen every day.

 

scab 2

 

  1. Take the brush from the lid of the latex (or Q-Tip if you don't have a brush) and smear a medium-light coat on the area.
  2. Add in the coffee. Push it in a bit.
  3. Let it dry.  It will dry fairly quickly. You don't need it to dry all the way before the next step.
  4. Add another layer of latex. I used my Q-Tip for this so that I wouldn't get the coffee into the latex. Use a different part of the Q-tip each time you dip into the latex.

 

scab 3

 

  1. Add in more coffee.
  2. Let it dry.
  3. Brush off the excess coffee that didn't stick.
  4. Dab more latex carefully on the scab. You just want a light coat to seal the coffee in and to give you a surface for the paint.
  5. With your finger, Q-tip, or a brush put red, purple, and some brown paint over the scab and around it to simulate dried blood and some slight bruising around.

 

scab 4

scab 5

 

Tada!  Super easy, right?

 

This would be fun for Halloween, for practical jokes, a social experiment, or of course, the stage!

 

[Tweet "I can make my own scabs minus the actual blood and pain."]

 

Where would you put your scab?

Mwah

 

How to Bruise Yourself With Stage Makeup

Want to look like you got beat up? Got a killer bruise or three?  

Come on!  It's fun!  Bonus: no pain is involved!

 

Let's round up the supplies and get right to it.

 

You'll need a bruise wheel.  I have a bruise and cut wheel from Ben Nye.

You'll also want black eyeliner and white eye shadow.  Lots of brushes!

If you don't have a bruise wheel you can use eye shadows, blush, liners, and red lipstick. Just make sure they aren't shimmery.

 

 

Black Eye

Make sure your face is clean.

Depending on the look you're going for -- gritty and natural or polished, you can choose to put on foundation or skip it.

 

bruise 21

 

  • Add red to your lower lid.
  • Add some red to your waterline, with care.
  • Take the red and outline where your bruise will be.  It should not be a clean line.  Bruises are irregular.  Think about what gave you that bruise.  On me it's a punch to the eye by some big ole creep of a man.  That jerk face.

 

For some reason you can't tell in these pictures, but I am sunburned.  Some of the paint in later pictures gets stuck in that area.  I moisturized it to help prevent it, but as the time went on it just dried out more.  Oh well.

 

bruise 22

 

 

  •  Fill in the whole area with red.  Make sure it's irregular and splotchy.
  • Add in purple to the inner eye and then a small amount along the eyelid.
  • Add it a bit heavier underneath the brow bone.  You want it darker where the blood collects the most.
  • At the points of impact it will swell and will not collect as much blood, so leave those light.
  • I circled around the edge of my cheek bone and brow bone.
  • I filled in more purple.
  • I added in more red because it's a fresh bruise, and when it's fresh it's more red than purple.
  • Blend!  This one is easy.  Blend in all different directions and keep it irregular.

 

bruise 8

 

 

  • I added in a bit of yellow at the bone and then covered it with some white eye shadow.
  • Draw a line with black eyeliner at the corner of the eye, the curve against the nose, not the corner of the tear duct.
  • Smudge it into the purple.
  • As the picture states, add in small amounts of purple and more red.

 

bruise 9

 

 

When you stipple this make it appear as broken blood vessels, which are very important to an authentic bruise.

bruise 10

 

1 - You just got hit about 30 minutes ago.

2 - It's been an hour, pretty fresh and man does it hurt!

3 - It'd been about 5 hours now.  It's a deeper purple.  Because of my sunburn the bruise looks too large here at the black arrow.  The other black arrow is my cute little girl.

4 - Your bruise is a few days old.  The purple is faded and becoming more brown.  The red areas are more yellow and green.  It's more mottled and splotchy.

 

[Tweet "Wanna black eye? Me too!"]

 

Kick to the Calf Bruise

When I want to kick somebody it's usually at the leg.  What better than a fleshy calf?

 

In retrospect I would have used someone else's chubby calf and not mine.  Just be kind while you're looking at the pictures and we can still be friends.  A'ight?

 

 bruise 11

 

  • This is the outline of the toe of the shoe or some other round object.  Blend it around.

 

bruise 23

 

  • Add in the purple ring, make sure it's not a clean line and blend it out. I used a brush to put the color on.

 

  • Use your finger to blend it into the skin.  You want it to look like it's in the skin, not on top of the skin.

 

bruise 14

 

  • Add in a ring of dark green into the purple and extend below it.
  • Put splotches of yellow in the green and a bit down under the ring.
  • Add in more red into the purple and fade inwards.

 

bruise 15

 

Stipple in some red, purple and green throughout the bruise.  This is high impact so it breaks capillaries.

 

bruise 24

 

I didn't like the way it looked.  It was too wide at the top of the arc.  I took a makeup remover wipe and took some of it off.

 

I took a tiny bit of purple and red and blended the line so it wasn't so straight and neat.

 

Walking around it looks like a big time owie.

 

Paintball Bruise

So you've been out on a man hunt for your buddies in the woods.  They got you before you got them.  Sorry Charlie.  You're just not quick enough.

 

bruise 18

 

  1. Draw a double ringed circle, about the size of a paintball.  You'll want there to be coagulation at one spot in the rings.
  2. Use your black eyeliner to add in some darker spots at the big blotch.  You've almost broken the skin and so you'll want it to bruise more at the highest point of impact.
  3. Take your purple and make a circle, sort of egg-shaped, out like the rays of the sun.
  4. Blend out.

 

bruise 19

 

  1. Add another ring of purple, just inside the first ring.  I wanted it in closer, plus it added more depth of some good splotch.
  2. I started adding in blue to the outside ring and more purple in the two rings.  Blend Blend Blend!
  3. Yellow is the next layer needed.  Put it inside the purple ring.
  4.  Add red over the yellow blending in, make sure it is irregular.  Smudge the inner ring of red (the smallest circle) outwards, just a smidge.  Stipple red and purple at the same area that the highest impact would be.

 

bruise 20

 

  • I took a small paint brush and added in some yellow dashes throughout the bruise.

 

You are now officially beat up.

 

My kids officially think I've lost my mind and my neighbors might call the cops soon.  I checked the mail, forgetting I had all this stuff on me.  Let's hope they don't try to arrest my husband for battery. At least I have these pictures as proof.

 

[Tweet "I beat myself up without any pain! You can too!"]

 

If you enjoyed the post consider sharing it with your friends.

 

Which bruise was your favorite?  Would you ever paint a bruise on and walk around town or go to the movies or out to eat?

 

Mwah

How to Look Really Old with Stage Makeup

This post may contain affiliate links. This does not effect the price.   

You wanna look old?  No!?

 

But it's so fun!

 

Okay... I'll be more specific.  Let's put on stage makeup for old age.  I promise, it's a lot of fun.

 

I totally freaked out my kids and husband.  The kids were watching me and saying how creepy I looked and asking me why I was doing this.  My eldest daughter wants me to do this for Halloween.  My youngest son said no to the creepy old lady face.  My husband jumped when I turned around.  So satisfying... I think.

 

[Tweet "I am about to learn how to look really old."]

 

Let's do this.

 

Materials needed:  Highlight, Shadow, brown eye liner, two small/medium flat brushes, and two wide flat brushes.

This kit is the one I used in theatre for college. It's got everything.

Nowadays, if you search for Ben Nye products all you'll see is Banana powder. Stinking Kardashians.

You can get a smaller personal kit if you'd like, instead of the full kit.

 

Not pictured: eyeliner and two wide brushes

 

Here I am.  Yes, that's before the old lady makeup, you dirty rat.  This is me at the end of a long day, okay. So there!  Yes, I did stick out my tongue.  I pulled back my bangs and hair so I could get to work. You should too.

 

pre-makeup face

 

Start with a fresh, clean face.

Put on a good foundation to even out your face for a good base. If your face is notoriously oily, I definitely recommend you put on a good primer first.

Picture Key:  White = Highlight  Black = Shadow

If you see a white arrow that is where you highlight.  If you see a black arrow that is where you shadow, etc.

 

We'll start from the top of the face to the bottom.  It's much easier this way, you won't smudge your makeup as you work.

 

Also, start with the highlights first.  You put in the big area of highlights, then the shading.  Then you add the specific highlights in afterwards.  Don't worry, I'll walk you through it.

 

Forehead

First, we'll age it with some basics.

 

aged forehead

 

Now we'll add in some wrinkles.  To do this:

  1. Raise your eyebrows to wrinkle your forehead up.  Good.
  2. Draw a flat line in each wrinkle.
  3. Let go of your eyebrows.
  4. Go back with your shadow and draw the line a bit darker and then gently drag your shadow straight up.  Not a ton, just a little bit.  See the picture for clarity.
  5. Take your highlight and draw a very precise line just underneath the shadow.  It needs to be crisp.
  6. Take a look and blend where needed.  DON'T blend your crisp highlight line.

 

Don't freak out!  At first it looks like brown lines on your face... it's okay.

 

ONLY do these wrinkles where you actually have them.  I am blessed with few forehead wrinkles.  I have two barely there ones.  I win!

 

forehead wrinkles

 

As you can see, I have also done wrinkles between my brows.  These are the ones that'll turn ugly when I'm older.  Yikes!

Treat them the same way, except DON'T blend the brown line.  Put a highlight line on the underside. If it's pretty vertical, put it on the inside part of the line (the part closest to the other eye).

 

Eyes

 

The best part!

  1. First, highlight lid.
  2. Take your shadow and start from the corner of your eye and get that eye socket shape.  Remember you're old, your eye is going to sink in a bit.
  3. Then do the crease.  I naturally have a droopy lid - it will hang down when I'm an old lady, I'm sure.  This is why I have taken my shadow and drawn it down with the natural crease of my eye lid.
  4. Add shadow at brow bone at a downward angle to get the droop effect.
  5. Later I went back and put more shadow on my lid for it to be more sunken in.

 

eye 1

 

 

Now the eye bag.  Yay!

  1. Add shadow on your lower lid.
  2. Highlight underneath it. The actual bag area.
  3. Take your highlighter and outline the outside edge of the eye bag drawn a line.
  4. Take more highlighter and blend that line out.  It'll look like a U.
  5. Take your shadow, draw the line just above the highlight line.  Blend up and in.  Make sure your bag is heavier at the corner and fades as it nears your eye.  It shouldn't reach your outer eye.

 

eye 2

 

  • Last,  you take your brown eyeliner (or darker shadow) and draw a crisp line at the bottom of the bag (just above the highlight).
  • Take your shading brush and blend slightly (upwards).
  • Add in wrinkles (where they naturally occur) at your eyes.  Crinkle your eyes to find them.
  • Draw in the shadow, then add a highlight underneath!  Easy!

 

eye 3

Nose

 

With old age your nose is bigger.  It's unfortunate, but true.  I'm making my nose wider and my nostrils bigger.

  1. To make wider you highlight down the nose, and the whole front portion of the nose.
  2. To make nostrils bigger, you highlight those as well, all the way to the crease where you nose and cheeks meet.
  3. Add shadow to the sides of your nose, draw a line right up next to the highlight and blend out to the cheeks into your foundation.
  4. For the nostrils, follow the natural curve, but just outside the actual crease to enlarge them.

 

nose 1

 

Yikes! What an angle!

 

 Cheeks

 

  1. Start at your nostril, follow the large crease down (if it's hard to find, smile, then follow the crease) to your mouth.
  2. In the first picture I have a brown line crossed out.  I didn't like the way it looked so I just wiped it off and fixed it.  No sweat.  You can see it fixed in the second picture.  
  3. Draw the line and have it keep going past the mouth.  Your cheeks are going to hang real low as you become geriatric.
  4. Blend that line out, it's a bit thicker than the rest of your wrinkle lines.
  5. Add a highlight inside.
  6. I added some to my whole cheek, blended carefully, no hard edge.

 

cheek 1

 

For an apple cheek - they'll be nice and full.  Probably from all that cake I'll be baking as a sweet ole granny.

  1.  Start at the nostril and sweep out and up.
  2. Blend upwards.
  3. Add highlight to the middle of the cheekbone and the surrounding cheek area.  You just want it more concentrated there.
  4.  Add a light coat underneath the shadow as well.
  5. Add some blush to the apples of your cheek if you'd like.

 

 cheek 2

 

 

Lips

 

In old age your lips become thinner.  Boo.  To do this is simple.

  1. Put foundation or highlighter over your lips.
  2. On your bottom lip add a natural lip color, but just inside your natural lip line.
  3. On the top lip add a darker color also inside the lip line.
  4. Add contouring with some shading and highlighting to the surrounding mouth area.
  5. Add wrinkles to your lips.  Done and done.

 

lips 1

 

 

 

lips 2

 

 

Jaw

 

  • Add highlight in a scallop motion alongside your jawline (above the ridge). It's like a 3, lying on its back, but 3 scallops, instead of 2.

 

jaw 1

 

  • Add triangles of highlight underneath your scallop.  (See the picture below)
  • Take your shadow and start at the top edge of the bottom highlight.  Is that confusing enough?  Make it a hard edge.
  • Then blend the shadow up to meet the top scallop.  You don't want a hard edge where those two meet.

 

jaw 2

 

Before, During, and After

Now, go back and touch up anything you'd like.  Your face may not be perfectly symmetrical, don't worry about it.  Remember, this is stage makeup.  It's best seen at a far distance, not right up close.  It'll still look pretty dang sweet though.

 

before and after old

Meet Granny Rochelle!

 

final

 

If you liked this post, please consider tweeting about it.

[Tweet "I can make myself look old now!"]

[Tweet "I might look as good as @rochelle_barlow does old, what do you think?"]

What stage makeup tutorial would you like next?