science

Homeschool Science Kits Make Life Stupid Easy

Your homeschool life needs science kits. Forget those cutesy monthly subscription boxes-- this is the one you ought to  

Do you struggle to stay consistent with your science curriculum? Need a no-prep plan? These science kits are exactly what you need to make science stupid easy. My kids love these kits and beg for science now! Plus, I enjoy it too. No more canceling science because we don't have something.

I received this product for free and was compensated for my 100% honest review.

 

 

I've been using a bunch of different science curriculum lately, if you couldn't tell. As a person that is fascinated by science it's important to me that my kids get some quality science in them.

Plus, I'm determined to get each one of them to fall in love with science as well.

Oh, and it's one of those things that makes me super nervous that my kids will miss something and sit there in college cursing my name and all that I represent.

 

Science curriculum woes

  • Are you consistently skipping science because you sit down and realize, "oh garbage, I'm missing the one key material we need?"
  • Are you consistently skipping science because you don't have the funds to buy buy buy the beakers, the petri dishes, the solutions, the microscope, the slides, the frog to dissect?
  • Are you consistently skipping science because you've forgotten to look over the material, set it all up, and be prepared?
  • Are you consistently skipping science because... ugh?

 

I said I loved science right?

  • Well, my bank account doesn't.
  • My procrastinator self doesn't.
  • My brain fog, bad memory doesn't either.

 

Teacher's manuals, lab books, copies, random piece of string, a bottle of some weird ingredient that I only need a teaspoon of, I'll never use again, and costs $40-- all kill me.

 

I wanted to do the experiments, I wanted to show my kids how amazing science was, but I just kept hitting a wall of reality and life.

 

Then breezed into my life homeschool science kits subscriptions by Insight to Learning.

Ohmygosh, guys. THIS. This is the answer.

 

Do you struggle to stay consistent with your science curriculum? Need a no-prep plan? These science kits are exactly what you need to make science stupid easy. My kids love these kits and beg for science now! Plus, I enjoy it too. No more canceling science because we don't have something.

I don't have to do a thing except order, open, do it, and return them when done.

 

They've literally done everything for me.

This is a procrastinator's, a forgetful flake's, and a financially strapped person's dream come true.

 

I open the big glorious box.

It is stupid simple organized.

 

Do you struggle to stay consistent with your science curriculum? Need a no-prep plan? These science kits are exactly what you need to make science stupid easy. My kids love these kits and beg for science now! Plus, I enjoy it too. No more canceling science because we don't have something.

 

There are 5-6 lessons in each box.

Each lesson is in its own huge ziplock bag. Clearly labeled.

The Teacher's Manual is in its own bag, with copies of lab sheets (copies y'all!) in the same bag. Clearly labeled.

What do I do when it's time for science?

  1. I pull out our science kit box.
  2. Pull out the lesson for the day (1-5)
  3. Pull out the Teacher's Manual, open it to the lesson we're on, and go.
  4. Do the lesson (read a book or watch a DVD-- it's included!)
  5. Ask the questions suggested.
  6. Pull out the remaining materials from the activity bag and start the experiment.

 

The Teacher's Manual has starter questions, vocabulary, the lesson material to cover, follow up questions, and the experiment instructions.

Also included are the master sheets for the copies you'll want to make (only if you run out of the paper they included in the science kits).

 

Dream come true

I don't have to read it the night before, the week before, or ever. I read it for the first time when the kids are hearing it for the first time.

I could go as far as letting the kids do this on their own should I feel the inclination or have the need.

 

If my husband, mother-in-law, or babysitter was subbing for the day (should I randomly jet off to England one day) they could do this with complete ease and no stress/freak-out.

 

Do you struggle to stay consistent with your science curriculum? Need a no-prep plan? These science kits are exactly what you need to make science stupid easy. My kids love these kits and beg for science now! Plus, I enjoy it too. No more canceling science because we don't have something.

 

Yeah, but do the kids like the science kits?

Well... they loved it!

What's even better, when the subject of what we'd learned recently came up in a random conversation with other people they remembered it! They remembered the new vocabulary, what they meant, and how they worked.

That's the most important part, right? That they're learning and retaining what they learned.

 

We have the kit from the 2nd grade subscription (I have a 2nd, 3rd, & 5th grader) titled Earth's Place in the Universe. (*Note, this is the link to the classroom kit, so don't freak out at the big price tag).

We've learned about erosion, earthquakes, volcanoes, the layers of the earth, and caves (growing our own stalactites).

 

My kids want to do the experiments over and over again. They're sad when I tell them it's time to move on. When Dad comes home they can't wait to show him what they did and learned.

Do you struggle to stay consistent with your science curriculum? Need a no-prep plan? These science kits are exactly what you need to make science stupid easy. My kids love these kits and beg for science now! Plus, I enjoy it too. No more canceling science because we don't have something.

Hook yourself up with a science subscription

 

1. Pick the grade you want to use. I used one kit for my 3 oldest children (pay $5 for supplies for an extra child). You receive a discount if you purchase 2 separate grade level kits.

My plan is to go through one grade level and then go up a grade until we reach the end of their kit levels (5th grade).

2. Every 6-8 weeks a new box with 5-6 lessons and activities is shipped to you.

3. Go through each lesson at your own pace (we do one a week).

4. When you're done you ship all the non-consumable items back. Things like the teacher's manual, measuring spoons, DVDs, books, etc.

They include a laminated list when you first open up the package clearly listing out the items to be returned and the items you can keep.

They literally include everything (except water) that you'll need for the experiments. An empty water bottle, measuring spoons, string, plastic spoons (to stir with), a beaker, aluminum pans, clay, erasers, construction paper, cups.

 

We only have to be alive and awake and have water nearby, should we need it, to do the experiments.

 

You could open this box in an empty hotel room and do these experiments.

 

I really loved that the liquid ingredients (clearly labeled) were in a mega-tight container, and double bagged. I don't see how any container would ever leak, but just in case, there's 2 bags to contain it all.

 

The teaching materials (books and DVDs) are high quality. Real science terms, real science, and clear explanations. No fluff here.

 

What if I want to keep the kits?

If you don't want to return the items you would just buy the boxes instead of using the subscription.

This would be nice if you wanted to keep the materials to use for younger children as they get older.

 

 

Hands down this is an amazing subscription to get. Forget those other monthly subscription boxes. This science kit is beneficial to both you and your children.

 

First time subscribers get 50% of their first month's subscription (this offer never expires). Insight to Learning will mail you a check for $12.50 in your first box you receive.

 

Final verdict

This is one of my favorite investments for our homeschool this year. It's made science easy, simple, doable, effective. It gets DONE!

 

Q: What year kit do you want to start with?

An Effective & Easy Homeschool Science Curriculum You'll Love

Science is a subject that can scare even the toughest homeschool mom. I've found a curriculum that will teach your kids real science easily. My kids love this curriculum and they used to hate science. Science is one of those subjects that can scare many a homeschool mom.

 

So many moms say:

  • I can't homeschool high school because I can't do high school science.
  • I can't homeschool because I can't give my kids the full science education they need.
  • I can't do science because I hate science.
  • I stink at science.
  • I never got it.
  • My science teacher was an imbecile and I still haven't recovered.

 

Whatever the reasoning behind it is, I'm here to say, there's another way. You CAN do science, and do it well, in homeschool.

You can teach science the right way and not let's-make-a-baking-soda-volcano-and-call-it-good type science.

 

I'm a do-it-yourself type of gal. If I could make, grow, create, build everything I use, I totally would. I have a secret fantasy to live out in the middle of nowhere on a huge ranch/farm and just live off what we produce and make with our own hands.

My husband, being Mr. Indoorsy, would like to stay close to civilization.

As as DIY-er, I love to cobble together my own homeschool curriculum and I love to plan and pull together resources.

 

In my 6 years of homeschooling, I've realized that my time is better spent NOT doing that.

Not sapping my energy trying to put together the best resources I can find (and not spending tons of money) and not pouring all my limited energy into building a curriculum.

So, what curriculum would I use?

 

When I first decided to homeschool, I searched for weeks for THE BEST science curriculum for my children. I found Real Science-4-Kids and started teaching my kiddos Chemistry.

Then, the next year, I got hit by the "I need to do more more more" bug, and thought, this needs to be harder (for me) for it to be effective.

Can I get a collective eye roll?

 

Sometime last year I slapped my own face and rolled my eyes so far back I fell asleep for a week.

 

I've been on the hunt for science goodness for my kids ever since.

Something that could satisfy my desire for a real, thorough, and solid education. Something that wouldn't be one more thing to do that never got done because I was overwhelmed, and wouldn't be something that I'd never do because I'd forget to grab the stinking supplies.... again.

I happened again on Real Science-4-Kids. This time, their grade level curriculum instead of by individual subject.

I received this for free in exchange for my honest review and compensated for my time, not my opinion.Science is a subject that can scare even the toughest homeschool mom. I've found a curriculum that will teach your kids real science easily. My kids love this curriculum and they used to hate science.

 

I have 5th, 3rd, 2nd, and PreK/K graders. My 5th grader is behind in science (remember that cobbling that lead to burnout, which led to not doing it consistently?) so I decided to go with the 3rd grade level to meet in the middle. Pull my 2nd grader up, meet my 3rd grader, and help my 5th grader to be confident while he improves.

 

I love RS4K because it gives you a taste of each science subject. Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Earth, and Astronomy for a total of 22 lessons.

My kids, who keep telling me they don't like science, enjoy reading the textbook, looking at the pictures, and then seeing for themselves with their own experiments.

 

That's my favorite bit.

What they read in the student textbook is then proven to them through a simple, doable, no random expensive materials required, experiments.

Little Miss (3rd grader), was all about learning why oil and water don't mix and then why when you add soap they do. In fact, I loved learning about it.

 

Science is a subject that can scare even the toughest homeschool mom. I've found a curriculum that will teach your kids real science easily. My kids love this curriculum and they used to hate science.

Science is a subject that can scare even the toughest homeschool mom. I've found a curriculum that will teach your kids real science easily. My kids love this curriculum and they used to hate science.

 

The way they show the molecules in the book made it visually easy for the kids to see the similarities, differences, and connections within the lesson. They could see why water and sugar mix and why water and oil do not just by looking at the picture.

 

Captain (the 5th grader) is not groaning when I say it's time for science. He's especially excited to do the experiments.

I call that a major win.

 

We received 3 books. Student Textbook, Teacher's Manual, and the Laboratory Notebook. Not one of these books are unnecessary. They each play an important part.

 

The Student Textbook has all the lessons, written out easily for the kids to understand, but not dumbed down.

We've read these lessons together, and I've had them read them with each other (while I'm taking care of the baby).

We've also read some of the chapters during morning time as review and extra time to sneak science into our school days.

 

Science is a subject that can scare even the toughest homeschool mom. I've found a curriculum that will teach your kids real science easily. My kids love this curriculum and they used to hate science.

 

The Laboratory Notebook has all the pre-lab questions to think about, and answer, the graphs, charts, and notes sections for the experiments, and then follow up questions after the lab is over to summarize what you've learned, compare your hypothesis with the results, and wrap it up nicely with an explanation as to what happened and why back in the Teacher's Manual.

 

The Teacher's Manual tells you what materials are needed for each lesson, how to conduct the lesson, what questions to ask, in what order, etc. You don't have to think.

If you're running behind on prep time, you know you can just open it up and go without having to teach yourself first.

 

 

The hallmarks of a good curriculum are:

•my kids understand it

•my kids want to do it

•my kids are learning and retaining at each lesson

•it's easy for me to do, even if I am sick, tired, stressed, or busy

•it's accurate

•I enjoy it

•I'm learning/re-learning

I'm sure there's some other standards, but these cover the most basic of my standards and benchmarks.

Real Science-4-Kids meets them all.

Teaching science when life is chaotic

After having had 6 babies, 3 while I homeschooling , and having HG each time, being able to give my children a quality education when I'm laid out on the couch, not having been able to keep down food or water in 24+ hours, exhausted, worn out, and stressed is vital.

I can't pile on guilt on top of all those other things!

 

I may be done with having children, but understanding days don't always work out, and the fact that life happens, no matter what you plan-- I always want to have in place something that is going to work for my family no matter the circumstance.

 

I don't mean to sound so maudlin, but having a wonderful science curriculum takes away stress and worry from my shoulders.  I can cross this worry off my list when I'm laying there at night, worrying.

Worrying I'm missing something, worrying I'm not doing enough, worrying my kids will turn into horrible people or with no prospect at happiness and success and intelligence.

Because of course, when we're worrying, we're never rational.

I can say to myself, "Rochelle, but you're doing science, they're doing it, they're getting it, they may not be science geniuses, but gosh dang it, they're smart and they're not going to start killing kittens because you homeschooled them."

 

It's real, solid, quality science

I don't want to teach my kids fluff. I want them to know what's what and really grasp and appreciate science for all that it's given our society and its possibilities.

My dream is for each of my children to fall in love with science, but since I can't control them (darn it), I'm going to settle for having a good understanding of it.

 

This is real science, not watered-down fluff. My kids are learning real science terms, real concepts, and referring to the things they're learning as though they were already scientists.

I'd encourage you to read this fantastic interview of Dr Keller (the author) and how this curriculum is different. This interview was a major reason why I fell in love with RS4K.

 

If you're looking for a science curriculum to get you headed in the right direction, to be your spine, then I highly highly recommend RS4K. Each year builds on each other, from Kindergarten all the way up to their newest release, grade 7.

 

If you're the unit study type, you can totally build off of the units within the text to suit your needs, and you know you'll have a solid foundation to turn to. If you wish, you can always use their Focus series to really explore the separate concentrations.

 

If you're the let's try lots of curricula type (raising my hand), then definitely use RS4K. I have several science curriculum for this school year. I have two that we will use as supplements, as specific units, but this one, is our main spine, our main constant.

 

When you aren't the biggest fan of science

Now, I can say this-- I love specific science concentrations. I love love biology and astronomy. I can appreciate chemistry for its coolness factor (but I sure hate those equations). I appreciate the other sciences, but I don't love to study them.

At least, I didn't.

The fact that RS4K has all the major concentrations of science is fantastic. I loathe physics and earth science is meh. Rocks? Yawn fest. I'd much rather learn about the body, elements, and the planets.

We've just started the physics section of the 3rd grade RS4K's text and I've gotta be honest, it's not bad at all! I've re-learned some things and am enjoying myself.

I love that it's set for me. I don't have to plan it, think about it, research it, none of that. I love that I can make sure my least favorite subjects are being taught well and my feelings won't effect my children.

Because really, I'm finding that physics isn't that bad. Plus, my kids are loving it.

 

Get Real Science-4-Kids for yourself

Since we're all on a tight budget, I love a good deal and sale.

Right now RS4K has a referral program going on.

You can get a $20 payback reward toward purchase for each referred friend who makes a purchase.

Plus, if your friends buy before September 30th they get 30% off.

You also can get $30 off too, if you purchase through this link.

RS4K-30percent-off

 

Winning all around!

I love this. Such a caring company looking out for the best of us homeschool families.

With each $20 you can turn around and buy next year's curriculum!

 

To sum it up

Look at what's most important to you in a homeschool curriculum. Let go of the things you think you ought to be doing and what others are. What is it that you value the most? What are your goals for your children?

Use those as a jumping point. If your goals and standards are anywhere near mine, then I suggest, friend to friend, that you look into RS4K.

Mwah

How to Use a Rigorous Curriculum (Even if Your Kids Aren't Gifted)

I received this product for free and am being compensated for the time to write the review.  This is an honest review of the product.

Maybe you don't think your kids are gifted. That's okay, you can STILL use a rigorous curriculum designed for gifted students to stretch their abilities.

 

Use a rigorous curriculum? Just what do you mean, Rochelle?

What's a rigorous curriculum?

 

Let's define what rigorous curriculum means. It's a curriculum that's not easy, not comfortable, not your average mamby-pamby stuff.

I'm not talking impossible. I'm not talking tear-inducing rigorous.

I'm referring to the feelings YOU get when you look at the curriculum.

 

Are you nervous it might be a little too much for your children? Are you unsure if they'll get it? That you can do it?

 

You want a good balance of doable and scary. It's just like picking a book for your kid to read.

You don't want to hand your 5th grader an easy reader. Your child isn't going to stretch their reading abilities.

You don't hand him a 5" thick book on quantum physics either and expect him to understand everything.

 

You want a book that's easy enough to give confidence, yet hard enough to push their abilities and stretch their minds.

THIS is what I mean by picking a rigorous curriculum.

Is that clearer now?

 

But my children... gifted?

I would NOT consider my children gifted.

They're smart, just sometimes I wonder if they know what color the sky is.

 

I want them to be gifted, but I'll be honest, I probably am to blame for part of it. I haven't pushed them near as hard as I could.

 

I purchase rigorous curriculum, and have high expectations, but then sometimes, I just don't hold them to it.

And sometimes, yes, I even underestimate them.

 

What's a homeschool mom to do?

Stop underestimating them. Stop underestimating me!

I resolved to change, to do better, to push push push because ohmygosh, I only have 8 years left with my oldest!!!

Panic time! How in the world am I going to make sure he's ready for college and life in just 8 years.

 

Someone get the smelling salts, I'm going to pass out.

 

I sat down with myself, gave myself a good talking to, and started to think.

  • What were the areas my kids were struggling in?
  • What are they behind in
  • What could they do do better in?
  • Where do I want them to be at the end of their time homeschooling?
  • At the end of this year?

 

Then I took each piece of curriculum I had and evaluated it based on this clear criteria.

Some things were great, I just needed to enforce it better.

Some things, not so great.

 

I needed a different science curriculum. I love my Unit Studies, and I will keep doing them, I just find that it's so easy for me to drop things or not do them because I think they'll be too hard, or too time consuming, or whatever the reason.

Or I don't make it challenging enough.

Either way, it's lame.

 

An easy solution

 

Then came into my life, The College of William & Mary and their Center for Gifted Children (published by Kendall Hunt).

I saw, "for gifted children," and nearly clicked away, but then I got to thinking....

 

My daughter loves vegetables because I told her years ago she loved veggies. She proudly walks around telling everyone she loves veggies and she does! She tries every single one of them and eats broccoli.

I loathe broccoli.

The point is-- if I tell my kids they can do this science curriculum, then they may just believe me.

If I tell myself they can as well, then I'll approach it with a higher expectation and better perspective.

Sounds cooky, but guess what, it totally works.

 

Picking which unit study I'd try first was HARD. I have a 1st, 2nd, and 4th grader (the rest are preschool, toddler, and baby).

My 4th grader was the most behind, my 2nd grader is advanced, and my 1st grader is capable, but struggles with focus.

 

I picked the grades 2-4 level, What a Find! --  a unit study on archaeology. So cool.

 

Maybe you don't think your kids are gifted. That's okay, you can STILL use a rigorous curriculum designed for gifted students to stretch their abilities.

 

Oh the books are beautiful. They are jam packed with goodness. Instructions, dialogue, examples, problems to solve, documents, assignments, and handouts.

Maybe you don't think your kids are gifted. That's okay, you can STILL use a rigorous curriculum designed for gifted students to stretch their abilities.

 

 

Maybe you don't think your kids are gifted. That's okay, you can STILL use a rigorous curriculum designed for gifted students to stretch their abilities.

 

Maybe you don't think your kids are gifted. That's okay, you can STILL use a rigorous curriculum designed for gifted students to stretch their abilities.

 

Holy crow, I read the instruction manual the first time and thought, there's no stinking way my children are going to understand this. What am I going to do?

Some of it was hard for me to understand. It's for 2-4th grade! Maybe I'm not that smart after all. :-/

 

I was determined to prove myself right. My kids could do this! I just needed to give them the chance to try.

 

I read through the first lesson again and really pondered what it meant until I was comfortable with the topic: systems.

 

The next morning, I gathered the kids around the table, pulled out our white board and a marker and got started.

I love that they have us talk about a refrigerator, something each of my children are very familiar with (hello, they're sneaking food all the time).

We labeled all the part of the fridge, talked about what it does, what goes in, what comes out, what needs to happen for it to work.

Maybe you don't think your kids are gifted. That's okay, you can STILL use a rigorous curriculum designed for gifted students to stretch their abilities.

 

My kids got it! They totally blew me away. Like completely and utterly. My 4 year old was even joining in on the conversation, and sometimes I'm not quite sure she knows her own name.

My 1st grader was 100% involved in the discussion, and so were my older kids.

 

We brainstormed other systems. They came up with a TON (you can see part of our list to the left of our fridge picture)!

 

When my 4-year-old named sand as a system, the other kids quickly realized that no, sand is not a system. Using the system parts they just learned, and the new vocabulary, they explained why sand was not a system.

 

They decided that sand was part of 2 other systems: the desert and ocean.

 

My Proud Mama tears were shed that day. Inside, of course.

 

I absolutely adore the problem-based study. It presents a problem to my kids. Since What a Find! is about archaeology, the problems are what an archaeologist would face every day.

 

Maybe you don't think your kids are gifted. That's okay, you can STILL use a rigorous curriculum designed for gifted students to stretch their abilities.

 

Then we brainstorm what we need to know to solve the problems, the materials needed, the information needed, and any other important tidbit.

After that, we go about finding that information, come back, present it, and move forward with the next bit of problem until we are at the final dig where we put it all together.

 

It's really got my kids thinking, processing, and solving problems. They're getting it and doing fantastically.

I'm feeling more and more confident with their abilities as we go through each lesson. THEY are feeling more confident.

 

I'm realizing, they can do this. We can do this. I'm profoundly excited and relieved to know that my kids are capable of this high caliber curriculum.

I realized I wasn't pushing them to their full potential. I was staying safe.

 

Adding in more rigorous curriculum

Once we're done with this unit, we're adding in history and another science unit.

 

With the remainder of our curriculum and plans for the year I've decided each one will be given the full push. If it's not stretching my kids it's getting the heave-ho.

I only have so much time with each of my babies.

I only have so much time to teach the what they need to be able to do, understand, and know before they're moving out.

 

I know it sounds dramatic, and maybe I am being a bit dramatic, but we mothers know it's true. We don't have a lot of time even to teach them basic character habits, and as homeschool moms we have an even bigger job in front of us.

 

Your Turn

Give your curriculum a good thorough going over. What could be improved upon? Where are they struggling? What's not challenging enough?

William & Mary has science, social studies, and language arts curriculum to challenge your kids at just the right level.

 

Be sure to follow William & Mary so you can connect with them and find out more about all they have to offer. Facebook & Twitter.

Mwah

 

10 Insanely Easy Ocean Science Experiments

  Are you looking for some easy ocean science experiments? Don't want a ton of materials and spend tons of money and time gathering supplies for each experiment!  Get excited, because we could be besties.

 

Are you looking for some easy ocean science experiments? Don't want a ton of materials, money, and time gathering supplies for each experiment? Done and done.

Here are the 10 ocean science experiments we did, for reals with our unit study.

Honesty time-- I lurv science and I lurv science experiments. I don't love getting them all together and buying the most random materials that I will NEVER use again, or have to specialty order and shipping costs more than the freaking product. And I'll NEVER use it again!! And we're eating beans for a month because we've blown our school budget.

So I love simple, easy, cheap experiments that teach the concept, let the kids learn and explore and get excited about the topic.

 

You'll see all the experiments we did, along with instructions, explanations, and pictures (when I remembered to take a few shots).

Like seriously, I forgot to take pictures of the density experiment, so I will re-do it just for you when the kids are sleeping. The sacrifices I make for those I love (that's you, in case you were wondering).

Salt Water Density

The beginning of the unit study we started learning about and discussing the actual ocean.  How big it is, what it's made up of, and more. Salt water and its density seemed like a natural place to start.

Materials Needed

  • Egg
  • Two clear jars/vases/bowls
  • Water
  • Salt
  • Small toys
  • Whisk

1. Fill one jar with plain water.

2. Fill another with water and then add salt. We put in about 1/3c at first. I really wanted this to work, so I put in probably closer to 1/2c. I hate when science experiments don't go as promised. :-/  Stir like crazy.

Our water was lukewarm and Little Miss (8 y.o.) suggested we use hot water to help it mix better.

3. We had a selection of toys, little sea creatures, a medium sized rubber shark, a mega block, and a knight. We started with the knight. I asked them what they thought would happen when I put the knight in the plain water. Then I dropped him in. He sunk. The mega block floated. Then the remaining items all sunk.

Then we added the egg. It also sank.

4. Then I started with the egg in the salt water. They were so excited to see it floating! We added the remaining ingredients and they all sunk. Wah-wah-wah.

The kids suggested adding more salt, and that still didn't help.

This was when I attempted to discuss density. Things with higher density sink and things with lower density float. The salt makes the water more dense making it so that more items are less dense than the salt water, meaning more things can now float.

Why is this important? The kids thought it would help the fish swim and float better. Sweet Cheeks (4 y.o.) thought it would make it so they can float while they sleep. Cute!

Then we discussed why we thought the egg floated when the other objects didn't. The kids and I talked about perhaps it was because there was "liquidy stuff" inside the egg and there's liquidy stuff inside fish too and maybe that's why. Especially since the toys don't have food and blood inside them.

 

We veered off course a bit and I showed them how taking the Mega Block and a crumpled piece of paper I could put the block into the water and the paper would stay dry. They each had a turn trying it themselves.

We talked about how if you tilted it the water would go inside and the paper would get wet. When they pushed the block into the water I had them go slowly so they could feel the air pressure pushing against their hand.

In the video, Ocean, it briefly mentioned the old methods of exploring the ocean. At one point, explorers would be lowered down in a wooden box that had no bottom to it. This was how they were able to stay down there for a short time without the entire box being enclosed.

 

Captain (9 y.o.) pointed out water displacement and brainstormed why he thought this was happening.

 

I loved that despite the lackluster results of this experiment (only the egg floated when I wanted more to float), so I guess it wasn't a flop, really, we were able to get our brains working and thinking about all sorts of things related to what we were doing. To me, this is the essence of science. Curiosity, thinking, and exploring.

Layers of the Ocean

Materials

  • Mason jar
  • Water
  • Corn syrup
  • Rubbing alcohol
  • Dish soap (blue)
  • Vegetable oil
  • Food coloring (black, blue, green, purple)
  • Funnel
  • Spoon
  • 5 Small bowls
  • Measuring cup
  • Baster

1. Measure out 3/4c of each liquid. Pour into individual small bowls.

2. Add food coloring to each bowl and mix:

  • Black food coloring to the corn syrup.
  • Blue to the dish soap.
  • Blue & green to the water (keep it lighter than the dish soap).
  • Blue to the oil.
  • Light light blue to the rubbing alcohol.

 

3. Add the ingredients slowly and carefully in the following order:

Corn syrup [wc_fa icon="arrow-circle-o-right" margin_left="" margin_right=""][/wc_fa] dish soap [wc_fa icon="arrow-circle-o-right" margin_left="" margin_right=""][/wc_fa] water [wc_fa icon="arrow-circle-o-right" margin_left="" margin_right=""][/wc_fa]  oil [wc_fa icon="arrow-circle-o-right" margin_left="" margin_right=""][/wc_fa]  rubbing alcohol

4. Add labels to each layer. Done!

Sunlight Zone - rubbing alcohol

Twilight Zone - oil

Midnight Zone - water

Abyss Zone - soap

Trench Zone - corn syrup

Discuss the density of each liquid (relate it back to salt water density experiment). Ask: would salt water be on the same level in this jar as plain water?

 

Are you looking for some easy ocean science experiments? Don't want a ton of materials, money, and time gathering supplies for each experiment? Done and done.

 

I'm not going to lie, I got pretty ticked at this experiment. The dish soap got too dark. Grr. We put 2 drops of red! 2 drops! We were trying to make it purple. Instead, it turned red on top and black everywhere else. Tip: if you have blue dish soap, DON'T dye it at all.

Then the water. Oh the water. It just blended in with the soap. The vegetable oil was separated nicely, though it did bubble up. Then the rubbing alcohol kinda blended in, but made swirls as well.

I let it settle and am hoping to see some separation in the morning. But really, I'm just ticked I wasted 3/4c of dish soap.

Well, the kids did enjoy it, though admittedly, they were sad that it didn't look all awesome and separate. I followed the instructions from Steve Spangler science on how to do the liquid density experiment, but apparently I don't have the correct skill set.

 

I may do this paper and water jar version instead. Depends on our time and energy level.

 

We then read the book Down, Down, Down: A Journey to the Bottom of the Sea. It shows which marine animals live in which ocean zone with beautiful illustrations.

We used our plastic sea animals along with the book to determine which zone they are in and made a chart to match.

 

Shark Buoyancy

Materials

  • Toilet paper roll
  • Marker
  • 3 pennies
  • Balloon
  • Vegetable oil
  • Bowl
  • Water
  • Tape
  1. Draw a shark on the toilet paper roll (or cut out a shark on paper and tape it on).
  2. Tape 3 pennies, equally spaced, on the bottom of the toilet paper roll.
  3. Fill the bowl with water.
  4. Ask: what's going to happen to the shark? Drop the shark in the water and watch him sink. Discuss.
  5. Fill a balloon with vegetable oil, tie closed.
  6. Place the balloon inside the toilet paper roll, evenly.
  7. Observe: it's much heavier now! Ask: what's going to happen to the shark? Place the shark in the bowl of water and watch him float. Discuss!

Are you looking for some easy ocean science experiments? Don't want a ton of materials, money, and time gathering supplies for each experiment? Done and done.

 

Are you looking for some easy ocean science experiments? Don't want a ton of materials, money, and time gathering supplies for each experiment? Done and done.

Are you looking for some easy ocean science experiments? Don't want a ton of materials, money, and time gathering supplies for each experiment? Done and done.

 

The oil in the shark makes him buoyant.

Application and explanation:

ASK: What is holding us to the earth? (gravity). What is gravity?

There is gravity on land AND in the ocean. All the animals in the ocean are being pulled down, just like you are. Gravity holds us to the floor, and all our houses, cars, and toys, too. It also holds the ocean and the animals in the ocean down. But they aren't on the bottom of the ocean floor like you're standing on the floor!

What are they doing? They're floating.

How is this possible? Buoyancy!

ASK: What in the world is buoyancy?

Gravity pulls us down and buoyancy pushes us up! So the fish have made it so they can balance, or float. Many of them have a bladder, kind of like a ball, inside their bodies that is filled with gas. Think of a balloon when it's filled with air. The balloon is that bladder and the air in the balloon is the gas inside it.

Sharks don't have a bladder filled with gas. So what is helping them float? Their bodies do not have ANY bones, instead, they have cartilage. This cartilage is less dense. Remember, when we saw how less dense items floated easier in the water? Your ears and tip of your nose is made out of cartilage, too! Sharks also have a very large liver, and fins that help them steer and stay afloat.

Their bodies are still pretty heavy, of course, heavier and more dense than water. Their fins help them to move forward all the time. They never stop moving!

Their liver is much larger than ours. It's filled with oil, like what we just used in our experiment. It is similar to the bladder in the fish we just talked about. It gives the sharks neutral buoyancy. That means that it's not getting pushed up and it's not sinking down, but staying at the same level.

All of these things combine to help sharks stay afloat and not sink to the bottom of the ocean floor! Pretty cool, huh!?

The kids really loved this one. Their favorite part? Wiggling their ears with wonder as they realized that sharks were made of the cartilage.

How Whales Stay Warm

Materials

  • Crisco
  • 2 Ziplock baggies (sandwich or quart size)
  • Rubber band (big enough to fit around hand)
  • Bowl
  • Water
  • Ice
  1. Fill bowl with water and add lots of ice. You want it cold!
  2. Scoop a bunch of crisco into the first ziplock bag.
  3. Place the 2nd bag inside the first.
  4. Place your hand inside and secure both bags onto your hand with a rubber band.
  5. Squish the crisco around your fingers and hand. Use your free hand to do help. Don't worry, your hand will stay grease free!
  6. Place your free hand into the ice water. Yikes!
  7. Now, place your crisco hand into the water. It's not freezing!

The fat keeps the whales warm!

Are you looking for some easy ocean science experiments? Don't want a ton of materials, money, and time gathering supplies for each experiment? Done and done.

 

When I worked at a wilderness therapy program, we lived and hiked in snowy mountains. We'd hike and sleep in near-blizzards. We only had a tarp, sleeping pad, and sleeping bag to keep us warm (besides our clothes). No tents! We ate bacon at every meal. We added butter to our hot chocolate and anything we were making. We ate as much fat as we could every day to help keep us warm.

I still was freezing cold, so I'm not sure how much it helped, but I'm alive so it must have helped some!

They loved this experiment! They were shocked that their hand didn't get cold at all! It was a pretty cool feeling.

 

Maybe I'll slather myself in crisco when I head to the cold pools this summer? Get a wicked sunburn at the same time. Win-win, right?

You know I'm kidding, right?

Tide Pool

Materials

  • Roasting pan
  • Rocks
  • Sand (optional)
  • Plastic sea animals
  • Water (of course)
  • Clay/Play doh (optional)

Create a tide pool with your rocks. Look at pictures of real tide pools to see what they look like. Layer and build your rocks. Add sand, if you have it and want to.

You can also use play doh or clay to build up your tide pool.

Add in plastic animals in various locations of your tide pool. Try to add those that would actually be in your tide pool and leave out those that aren't.

Fill with water as the high tide comes in... and then empty as the low tide goes out. Then fill again and play!!

We watched a few videos on tide pools. [insert links]

 

Water/Shoreline Erosion

Materials

  • 9x13
  • Sand
  • Water
  • Water bottle
  1. Place sand on one side of the pan. Make it a steep slope
  2. Pour water into the other side, until it's halfway up your sand slope.
  3. Place your water bottle on the end with the water. Push the bottle down to create small waves. Do this, consistently and evenly for 1 whole minute. Write down what you observe.
  4. Push again with your water bottle for another minute. You may make your waves bigger, or keep them the same size. Make observations.

 

Ocean Bottle

Materials

  • Empty ketchup bottle (or other narrow-necked bottle with lid)
  • Corn syrup
  • Blue food coloring
  • Vegetable oil
  • Long spoon

Fill the bottle 1/4 of the way with corn syrup.

Add a few drops of blue food coloring and mix with spoon handle.

Slowly pour in vegetable oil until the bottle is halfway full.

Put cap on. Make sure it's real tight.

Turn the bottle on its side, tilt it slowly so the capped end is down at a slight angle. The corn syrup will crest in the bottle's neck.

Cornmeal Currents

Materials

  • Mixing bowl
  • Water
  • Cornmeal (a pinch)

Fill the mixing bowl with water, almost to the top.

Sprinkle the cornmeal into the bowl.

Blow steadily across the water surface (not into the bowl). Make sure it's not too gentle or too forceful (you can experiment with wind intensity later).

The cornmeal will be swirled around by the currents just as in the ocean. The northern hemisphere is clockwise and the souther, counter clockwise.

Deep-Water Currents

Materials

  • 9x13 pan
  • Water
  • Ice pack (or baggie of ice)
  • Food Coloring
  1. Fill the 9x13 with an inch of water. Make sure the water is room-temperature (or slightly warmer).
  2. Set the ice pack (or baggie) against the edge of one side of the pan (inside the water).
  3. Place 1 drop of food coloring right in front of the ice pack and 1 drop on the opposite side of the pan.
  4. Observe and discuss.

The drop near the ice pack will move forward  because the cold water is pushing the warm water away. The drop on the other side stays there because the cold water keeps it from moving.

 

Penguin Camo

Materials

  • Mason jar
  • Water
  • Craft foam, black & white
  • Glue stick
  • Scissors
  • Black paper
  1. Cut a 2" square out of the black and white craft foam.
  2. Glue them together and cut out a penguin shape.
  3. Fill the mason jar halfway with water and place the penguin, black side down on top of the water. Hold the jar under a light source (lamp, lightbulb, flashlight) and look at the penguin from the bottom of the jar. It should be easy to see.
  4. Now, turn the penguin over, white side down. Now look through the bottom of the jar again. This is the way penguins swim! It's much harder to see now because the light and the white blend together, making it harder for predators to see from underneath.
  5. This time, place the jar on top of the black paper. The black paper represents the darkness of the ocean. Take a look from above the jar to see how the black side of the penguin helps blend into the water from this angle!

 

That wraps up all our ocean science experiments! We had so many great conversations with each experiment and it's always a treasure to hear them talk about and relate other things to the new things they've learned.

As we've studied the ocean these have really added a great depth to their understanding and grasping of each concept. I highly recommend doing as many of these as you can.

If you're on the hunt for even more experiments (simple ones) with accompanying explanations I highly highly recommend the book Awesome Ocean Science! There are many experiments and activities for many aspects of the ocean. It covers all the topics, not just the water portion. I learned quite a bit just thumbing through the book! Seriously, go check it out. You'll thank me later. ;-)

 

Let me know which one your kiddos loved the most! Do you have any other fun ocean experiments for us to try?

Mwah