Phenomenal Poems to Rock Memory Work

Poems truly enrich and nourish your homeschool experience. Add in engaging, fun, moving, and delightful poems into your memory work. My kids really enjoyed these poems and keep asking for more!  

My feelings on poems has changed over the years.

When I was a kid I thought poems were dumb. Then I memorized Robert Frost's The Road Not Taken in 5th grade and it really struck me and has stuck with me all these years later.

I'm also still mad at my teacher for saying I didn't say the second "I" when I did! Ugh.

 

Then later on, I thought poetry was for old folks.

I was in college, and really trying to explore new interests. One day, at the library, I picked up a book on writing your own poetry. I soon became obsessed with writing poetry.

I eventually moved on, but I still remember the poems I wrote and the impact they had on me.

 

It wasn't until I found the Charlotte Mason method of homeschooling did I ever think of using poetry in our homeschool.

We began incorporating Tea Time into our week and my kids, my BOYS, love it. They love and connect to the rhythm and flow and emotion of the poems they read.

There's just something that really speaks to your soul when you read a well-written poem.

 

Poems for your homeschool

 

I'm going to share some of my favorite poems for you to use in your homeschool.

I did my best to provide the text for you without violating copyright laws. I hate having to hunt down resources and having a bajillion extra steps for something I'm trying to do. I don't have the time nor patience for it.

Plus, I'm lazy enough that it wouldn't happen. I'd just file it away in the "oh this would be nice to do one day" folder and forget about it.

 

Well, not today!

I'm going to put the poems in accordion tabs so you don't have to scroll through a beast of a post. And sometimes I'll provide just links. It really just depends on how long this post becomes.

 

Robert Frost

[wc_toggle title="The Road Not Taken" layout="box"]
Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;
Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim,
Because it was grassy and wanted wear;
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,
And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I kept the first for another day!
Yet knowing how way leads on to way,
I doubted if I should ever come back.
I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.

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[wc_toggle title="Stopping by the woods on a snowy evening" layout="box"]
Whose woods these are I think I know.
His house is in the village though;
He will not see me stopping here
To watch his woods fill up with snow.
My little horse must think it queer
To stop without a farmhouse near
Between the woods and frozen lake
The darkest evening of the year.
He gives his harness bells a shake
To ask if there is some mistake.
The only other sound’s the sweep
Of easy wind and downy flake.
The woods are lovely, dark and deep,
But I have promises to keep,
And miles to go before I sleep,
And miles to go before I sleep.

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More Robert Frost poems -- they also are in audio format here to read and listen to.

 


Robert Louis Stevenson

[wc_toggle title="My Shadow" layout="box"]

I have a little shadow that goes in and out with me,

And what can be the use of him is more than I can see.

He is very, very like me from the heels up to the head;

And I see him jump before me, when I jump into my bed.

 

The funniest thing about him is the way he likes to grow--

Not at all like proper children, which is always very slow;

For he sometimes shoots up taller like an india-rubber ball,

And he sometimes goes so little that there's none of him at all.

 

He hasn't got a notion of how children ought to play,

And can only make a fool of me in every sort of way.

He stays so close behind me, he's a coward you can see;

I'd think shame to stick to nursie as that shadow sticks to me!

 

One morning, very early, before the sun was up,

I rose and found the shining dew on every buttercup;

But my lazy little shadow, like an arrant sleepy-head,

Had stayed at home behind me and was fast asleep in bed.

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[wc_toggle title="Happy Thought" layout="box"]

The world is so full of a number of things,

I'm sure we should all be as happy as kings.

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[wc_toggle title="Time to Rise" layout="box"]

A birdie with a yellow bill

Hopped upon my window sill,

Cocked his shining eye and said:

"Ain't you 'shamed, you sleepy-head!"

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More Robert Louis Stevenson poems: 

A Child's Garden of Verses and at Poet's Corner and Poet's Corner

 


Christina G. Rossetti

[wc_toggle title="Mix a Pancake" layout="box"]
Mix a pancake,
Stir a pancake,
Pop it in the pan;
Fry the pancake,
Toss the pancake—
Catch it if you can.
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[wc_toggle title="Color" layout="box"]
What is pink? a rose is pink
By a fountain's brink.
What is red? a poppy's red
In its barley bed.
What is blue? the sky is blue
Where the clouds float thro'.
What is white? a swan is white
Sailing in the light.
What is yellow? pears are yellow,
Rich and ripe and mellow.
What is green? the grass is green,
With small flowers between.
What is violet? clouds are violet
In the summer twilight.
What is orange? Why, an orange,
Just an orange!
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William Blake

 

[wc_toggle title="To The Evening Star" layout="box"]

THOU fair-haired Angel of the Evening,

Now, whilst the sun rests on the mountains, light

Thy bright torch of love--thy radiant crown

Put on, and smile upon our evening bed!

Smile on our loves; and, while thou drawest the

Blue curtains of the sky, scatter thy silver dew

On every flower that shuts its sweet eyes

In timely sleep. Let thy West Wind sleep on

The lake; speak silence with thy glimmering eyes,

And wash the dusk with silver.--Soon, full soon,

Dost thou withdraw; then the wolf rages wide,

And the lion glares through the dun forest:

The fleeces of our flocks are covered with

Thy sacred dew; protect them with thine influence!

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More William Blake poems

 


Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

 

[wc_toggle title="Memories" layout="box"]

OFT I remember those I have known

In other days, to whom my heart was lead

As by a magnet, and who are not dead,

But absent, and their memories overgrown

With other thoughts and troubles of my own,

As graves with grasses are, and at their head

The stone with moss and lichens so o'er spread,

Nothing is legible but the name alone.

And is it so with them? After long years.

Do they remember me in the same way,

And is the memory pleasant as to me?

I fear to ask; yet wherefore are my fears?

Pleasures, like flowers, may wither and decay,

And yet the root perennial may be.

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[wc_toggle title="There was a little girl" layout="box"]
There was a little girl,
            Who had a little curl,
Right in the middle of her forehead.
            When she was good,
            She was very good indeed,
But when she was bad she was horrid.
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[wc_toggle title="Paul Revere's Ride" layout="box"]

 

Paul Revere's Ride

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Emily Dickinson

 

[wc_toggle title="Hope is the thing with feathers" layout="box"]
“Hope” is the thing with feathers -
That perches in the soul -
And sings the tune without the words -
And never stops - at all -
And sweetest - in the Gale - is heard -
And sore must be the storm -
That could abash the little Bird
That kept so many warm -
I’ve heard it in the chillest land -
And on the strangest Sea -
Yet - never - in Extremity,
It asked a crumb - of me.

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[wc_toggle title="There is no Frigate like a book" layout="box"]
There is no Frigate like a Book
To take us Lands away
Nor any Coursers like a Page
Of prancing Poetry –
This Traverse may the poorest take
Without oppress of Toll –
How frugal is the Chariot
That bears the Human Soul –
[/wc_toggle]

More Emily Dickinson poems

 


More poems to know

[wc_toggle title="Dentist and the Crocodile by Roald Dahl" layout="box"]
The crocodile, with cunning smile, sat in the dentist’s chair.
He said, “Right here and everywhere my teeth require repair.”
The dentist’s face was turning white. He quivered, quaked and shook.
He muttered, “I suppose I’m going to have to take a look.”
“I want you”, Crocodile declared, “to do the back ones first.
The molars at the very back are easily the worst.”
He opened wide his massive jaws. It was a fearsome sight—
At least three hundred pointed teeth, all sharp and shining white.
The dentist kept himself well clear. He stood two yards away.
He chose the longest probe he had to search out the decay.
“I said to do the back ones first!” the Crocodile called out.
“You’re much too far away, dear sir, to see what you’re about.
To do the back ones properly you’ve got to put your head
Deep down inside my great big mouth,” the grinning Crocky said.
The poor old dentist wrung his hands and, weeping in despair,
He cried, “No no! I see them all extremely well from here!”
Just then, in burst a lady, in her hands a golden chain.
She cried, “Oh Croc, you naughty boy, you’re playing tricks again!”
“Watch out!” the dentist shrieked and started climbing up the wall.
“He’s after me! He’s after you! He’s going to eat us all!”
“Don’t be a twit,” the lady said, and flashed a gorgeous smile.
“He’s harmless. He’s my little pet, my lovely crocodile.”
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[wc_toggle title="Porcupines by Marilyn Singer" layout="box"]
Hugging you takes some practice.
So I'll start out with a cactus.
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[wc_toggle title="Help Wanted by Timothy Tocher" layout="box"]
Santa needs new reindeer.
The first bunch has grown old.
Dasher has arthritis;
Comet hates the cold.
Prancer's sick of staring
at Dancer's big behind.
Cupid married Blitzen
and Donder lost his mind.
Dancer's mad at Vixen
for stepping on his toes.
Vixen's being thrown out—
she laughed at Rudolph's nose.
If you are a reindeer
we hope you will apply.
There is just one tricky part:
You must know how to fly.
[/wc_toggle]
[wc_toggle title="April Fool by Myra Cohn Livingston" layout="box"]
The maple syrup's full of ants.
                                    A mouse is creeping on the shelf.
                                   Is that a spider on your back?
             I ate a whole pie by myself.
The kitchen sink just overflowed.
                                   A flash flood washed away the school.
             I threw your blanket in the trash.
                                   I never lie————I————
                                                                                APRIL FOOL!
[/wc_toggle]
[wc_toggle title="Jabberwocky by Lewis Carroll" layout="box"]

’Twas brillig, and the slithy toves

Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:

All mimsy were the borogoves,

And the mome raths outgrabe.

“Beware the Jabberwock, my son! The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!

Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun

The frumious Bandersnatch!”

 

He took his vorpal sword in hand; Long time the manxome foe he sought—

So rested he by the Tumtum tree

And stood awhile in thought.

 

And, as in uffish thought he stood, The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame,

Came whiffling through the tulgey wood,

And burbled as it came!

 

One, two! One, two! And through and through

The vorpal blade went snicker-snack!

He left it dead, and with its head

He went galumphing back.

 

“And hast thou slain the Jabberwock?

Come to my arms, my beamish boy!

O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!”

He chortled in his joy.

 

’Twas brillig, and the slithy toves

Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:

All mimsy were the borogoves,

And the mome raths outgrabe.

[/wc_toggle]
[wc_toggle title="Don't worry if your job is small by Anonymous *" layout="box"]

Don't worry if your job is small

And your rewards are few.

Remember that the might oak

Was once a nut like you.

[/wc_toggle]

 

[wc_toggle title="Blow blow thou winter wind by William Shakespeare" layout="box"]

Blow, blow, thou winter wind

Thou art not so unkind

As man's ingratitude;

Thy tooth is not so keen,

Because thou art not seen,

Although thy breath be rude.

 

Heigh-ho! sing, heigh-ho! unto the green holly:

Most freindship if feigning, most loving mere folly:

Then heigh-ho, the holly!

This life is most jolly.

 

Freeze, freeze thou bitter sky,

That does not bite so nigh

As benefits forgot:

Though thou the waters warp,

Thy sting is not so sharp

As a friend remembered not.

Heigh-ho! sing, heigh-ho! unto the green holly:

Most freindship if feigning, most loving mere folly:

Then heigh-ho, the holly!

This life is most jolly.

[/wc_toggle]

 

 

William Shakespeare Sonnets

[wc_toggle title="O Captain! My Captain! by Walt Whitman" layout="box"]
O Captain! my Captain! our fearful trip is done,
The ship has weather’d every rack, the prize we sought is won,
The port is near, the bells I hear, the people all exulting,
While follow eyes the steady keel, the vessel grim and daring;
                         But O heart! heart! heart!
                            O the bleeding drops of red,
                               Where on the deck my Captain lies,
                                  Fallen cold and dead.
O Captain! my Captain! rise up and hear the bells;
Rise up—for you the flag is flung—for you the bugle trills,
For you bouquets and ribbon’d wreaths—for you the shores a-crowding,
For you they call, the swaying mass, their eager faces turning;
                         Here Captain! dear father!
                            This arm beneath your head!
                               It is some dream that on the deck,
                                 You’ve fallen cold and dead.
My Captain does not answer, his lips are pale and still,
My father does not feel my arm, he has no pulse nor will,
The ship is anchor’d safe and sound, its voyage closed and done,
From fearful trip the victor ship comes in with object won;
                         Exult O shores, and ring O bells!
                            But I with mournful tread,
                               Walk the deck my Captain lies,
                                  Fallen cold and dead.
[/wc_toggle]
[wc_toggle title="There was an Old Man with a beard by Edward Lear" layout="box"]
There was an Old Man with a beard,
Who said, "It is just as I feared!—
Two Owls and a Hen, four Larks and a Wren,
Have all built their nests in my beard.
[/wc_toggle]
[wc_toggle title="If by Rudyard Kipling" layout="box"]
If you can keep your head when all about you
    Are losing theirs and blaming it on you,
If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,
    But make allowance for their doubting too;
If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,
    Or being lied about, don’t deal in lies,
Or being hated, don’t give way to hating,
    And yet don’t look too good, nor talk too wise:
If you can dream—and not make dreams your master;
    If you can think—and not make thoughts your aim;
If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster
    And treat those two impostors just the same;
If you can bear to hear the truth you’ve spoken
    Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools,
Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken,
    And stoop and build ’em up with worn-out tools:
If you can make one heap of all your winnings
    And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss,
And lose, and start again at your beginnings
    And never breathe a word about your loss;
If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew
    To serve your turn long after they are gone,
And so hold on when there is nothing in you
    Except the Will which says to them: ‘Hold on!’
If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,
    Or walk with Kings—nor lose the common touch,
If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you,
    If all men count with you, but none too much;
If you can fill the unforgiving minute
    With sixty seconds’ worth of distance run,
Yours is the Earth and everything that’s in it,
    And—which is more—you’ll be a Man, my son!
[/wc_toggle]
[wc_toggle title="Sign by Shel Silverstein*" layout="box"]

Sign

[/wc_toggle]

 

[wc_toggle title="Tell Me by Shel Silverstein*" layout="box"]

Tell Me

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More Shel Silverstein poems:

Where the Sidewalk Ends, Light in the Attic, The Giving Tree, Falling Up, Everything On It, A Giraffe and a Half, Runny Babbit: A Billy Sook

 

Using poetry in your homeschool

It's pretty simple to use poetry in your homeschool.

  • Read it during Tea Time.
  • Memorize it during Morning Time.
  • Write your own.
  • Study poets.
  • Read a book of poems aloud as a family.

 

Make it as simple or as grand as you like. Even if you think your kids won't enjoy it, or heck, if you think you'd rather walk on shards of glass and clean up a skunk attack, find a way to read poetry.

You'll be surprised at the enrichment and mind nourishment you receive.

Just copy and paste the poems I've included here, put them in a document, hit print and put it in your binder and you're good to go.

Just pick a poem and run with it.

On Day 5 I'll share with you how to put it all together easily and without lots of searching, and thinking.

 

3 extra poems for you

If you haven't downloaded the FREE ASL memory work packet, there's 3 more reasons for you to do so today!

I've included 3 fantastic poems in the packet for you to learn to sign.

So. much. fun.

Download them today:

[convertkit form=4901805]

 

Feeling behind? Catch up:

Main: The Best Step-by-Step Guide to Memory Work

Day 1: Improve Your Child's Relationship to God with Memory Work

Day 2: 75 Quotes for Memory Work

Come back tomorrow for Day 4.  Day 4 is here!

 

 

Mwah

 

 

 

 

Click the picture to read more 5-day series posts. 

5 Day Hopscotch iHN 2016