3 Creative & Engaging Ocean Math Activities

What's an ocean unit study without some great ocean math activities to go with it? Nothing, I tell ya, nothing! I have one kid that lives and breathes math. Seriously, it's what he does for fun. I have another kid that thinks math is a form of punishment (we're working on changing that belief), and another who'd just rather play all day than do anything school related.

All 3 of these ocean math activities worked out well for each of them and were enjoyed. I say that's a win!

Want another win?

I created some super fun ocean math worksheets for you to use. Well, maybe they're not SUPER fun, but they are useful and FREE.

 

What's an ocean unit study without some great ocean math activities to go with it? Here's 3 creative math activities that appeal to everyone. Click to grab the free worksheets to make it even easier!

 

Let's get to it!

Sea life measure and compare

This activity was a hit! In fact, I think I loved it more than the kids did.

The object of this activity:

  • Really understand how big these animals truly are
  • Practice measuring
  • Do some simple comparing

We first did some quick research to find out how big each animal becomes.

Blue whale, baby Blue whale, Great White shark, Bottlenose dolphin, and Killer whale (Orca).

We drove to our church's parking lot, grabbed some sidewalk chalk, our measuring tape, and got to work.

We first measured the blue whale. The kids were amazed that it was really 100 ft and that 100 ft was so huge!

We drew a line from tip to tip. That was not as easy as you'd think.

What's an ocean unit study without some great ocean math activities to go with it? Here's 3 creative math activities that appeal to everyone. Click to grab the free worksheets to make it even easier!

 

I didn't know if we had enough sidewalk chalk to draw the whale, we were working with chalk nibs, that we just measured out the other animals right next to the blue whale line.

 

What's an ocean unit study without some great ocean math activities to go with it? Here's 3 creative math activities that appeal to everyone. Click to grab the free worksheets to make it even easier!

 

After drawing out the lines, I realized we did have enough chalk, and had the kids draw out the whale. It was an interesting adventure. That poor whale was crooked and non-whale in appearance, but they did their best and my controlling nature was held in check as I let the lines stay crooked and didn't change any of their efforts.

I deserve an award.

 

What's an ocean unit study without some great ocean math activities to go with it? Here's 3 creative math activities that appeal to everyone. Click to grab the free worksheets to make it even easier!

 

Since the lines of the other animals were inside of the whale's head, we didn't draw them. I had intended to.

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Tip: Draw the biggest animal first, then measure out and draw the remaining animals one at a time to make sure you have enough room.

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What's an ocean unit study without some great ocean math activities to go with it? Here's 3 creative math activities that appeal to everyone. Click to grab the free worksheets to make it even easier!

 

After this I had the kids lie down (or is it lay down?) next to the whale and measured each. It was crazy to see how tiny they were! I made the Captain do it twice because I thought for sure he was taller than the two little lines on the ground showed.

 

What's an ocean unit study without some great ocean math activities to go with it? Here's 3 creative math activities that appeal to everyone. Click to grab the free worksheets to make it even easier!

 

We answered the questions I had written out ahead of time. After a while... it got a little sweaty and the Wee Babe and Teddy Bear were more than done and we headed home to the comfort of a/c and ice water to finish up.

I've included a log sheet for your measurements AND questions for you in the FREE worksheets I whipped up for you. Mwah!

Aquarium math activity

I handed each kid a chart of items and prices to fill their aquarium.

Then I handed them several word problems that required this chart to answer questions.

Chart:

  • Gravel: $0.08 per pound
  • Plants: $0.12 per bag
  • Angelfish: $0.11 each
  • Neons: $0.09 each
  • Gouramis

small: $0.07 each

large: $0.12 each

  • Snails: $0.04 each
  • Turtles: $0.24 each

Questions:

  1. Kevin's favorite fish are angelfish. He has $0.75 to spend. How many can he buy? How much will he have left?
  2. Samantha wants to buy 5 neons for her aquarium. How much will they cost?
  3. Max likes gouramis. With his $1.00, how many large gouramis can he buy? How much money will be left? What if he buys small gouramis instead?
  4. Melanie has $0.32 and needs new plants for her aquarium. She plans to buy 3 bags. Does she have enough? How much can she buy?
  5. If Sydney buys 12 snails, how much will it cost?
  6. Daniel just bought 3 pounds of gravel and has $0.04 left over. How much did he have to start with?
  7. How much would it cost if you bought: 4 pounds of gravel, 3 plants, 1 angelfish, and 5 turtles?
  8. You have $3.00, fill the aquarium with anything you like (using the chart). What did you get? How much do you have left?

 

What's an ocean unit study without some great ocean math activities to go with it? Here's 3 creative math activities that appeal to everyone. Click to grab the free worksheets to make it even easier!

 

I'm lazy efficient and just wrote it on a nearby index card instead of hunting for paper, or printing it out. Instead, I'll let you have the chance to do a quick print out if you'd like, instead of writing it out.

 

Ocean pie chart

The earth is 1/3 land and 2/3 ocean. Get creative to illustrate just how much that means in real life.

Use food, materials around you, paper and paint, markers, etc. Make a regular ole chart. Use counting bears, or chips.

I've put some fun ideas in the free worksheet bundle I made for ya. Pick one, pick two, or pick them all. Check it out!

 

What's an ocean unit study without some great ocean math activities to go with it? Here's 3 creative math activities that appeal to everyone. Click to grab the free worksheets to make it even easier!

 

Want more ocean math activities?

Here are some other cute ocean math activities I found when I needed something easier for my 1st grader as well as my 4-year-old when she begged me for some school work of her very own.

Fish bubble counting mats (good for youngers learning to count)

Swimming school bar graph (good for Kindergarteners)

Fish pattern mats (we used the two fish and penguin pattern mats)

Subtract the fish (we used this activity, but there are a few more cute ones as well)

Ocean count and clip cards (good for youngsters)

Walk the plank: skip counting (super cute!)

 

I hope you find an activity your children will enjoy. If you don't do anything else, be sure to at least head out and measure how big a blue whale is! It's incredible, even to me, to see just how big it really is. It's so easy to read a number and go, wow, that's big, and another to see it.

It's such an incredible world we live in with so many amazing animals and creatures around us. It's a treat to be able to appreciate their size, their lives, and the awesome balance that goes on in the ocean and here, on land. If we can appreciate any part of this AND learn a bit of math skills along the way, we're much better for it.

Have fun!

 

Mwah

 

 

 

 

P.S. Don't forget to download the worksheets! They're free.

 

More ocean unit study goodness

Ocean unit study

Ocean signs (with free worksheets)

Ocean geography, vocab, and writing

Ocean science experiments